Archive for September, 2012


21st Century Dub (Roir, 1980)

This is a combination rerelease of Pecker Power and Instant Rasta, two albums recorded by Japanese percussionist Pecker in conjunction with Jamaican musicians. It’s an interesting effort, combining a certain Jamaican rawness with a sophisticated Japanese surface, and it certainly comes equipped with the reggae muscle to kick it along – Sly & Robbie on the one hand, and the Wailers band on the other, and both Channel One and Tuff Gong studios (if only they’d managed Federal as well, but that might have meant the Dragonaires as a backing band).

I’m not sure exactly how much of Pecker’s work is really being heard on this album, but that really isn’t the point – the point is more that it’s a good reggae and dub set. ROIR is the home of some killer reggae, and this album is no exception to Neil Cooper’s rule. I’d consider “21st Century Dub” a must-have for any dub fan, great or small.

“Some of the best dub of all time. This complete reissue of two Japanese LP’s (‘Pecker Power’ and ‘Instant Rasta’) combines the best of classic mid-70’s dub (Joe Gibbs ‘African Series’, Pablo, Tubby styles) with the best in technological advances. Quite simply, classic.” – Peter Wright (now GM of Rykodisc) 1987
From ROIR site:
“An amazing but true story about an experimental dub session organized by BOB MARLEY in Jamaica in 1979!!!

In 1979 during a visit to Japan, Bob Marley met the acclaimed Japanese percussionist Pecker. Pecker, a big fan of reggae, convinced Marley to bring top Japanese musicians (mostly members of The Yellow Magic Orchestra) to Jamaica to mix it up with the cream of Jamaican reggae artists, to jam and play out in informal dub sessions at both Channel One and Tuff Gong Studios. The astounding results were released only in Japan on two separate LP’s in 1980.”

Tracklist:
1. Pecker – Mystical Cosmic Vibrations (5:24)
2. Pecker – International Orchitis (4:10)
3. Pecker – Pecker Power Part Two (1:25)
4. Pecker – Pecker Power Part One (5:07)
5. Pecker – Concrete Jungle (5:11)
6. Pecker – Militant Sniff (4:27)
7. Pecker – Jamming (4:11)
8. Pecker – Mystical Electro Harakiri (5:02)
9. Pecker – Beggar Suite Part 1 (4:54)
10. Pecker – Beggar Suite Part 2 (3:32)
11. Pecker – Beggar Suite Part 3 (2:49)
12. Pecker – Dub Jam Rock (4:50)
13. Pecker – Kylyn (6:42)
14. Pecker – Dr. Dr. Humanity (1:18)
21st Century Dub (Roir, 1980)
(192 kbps, small front cover included)

This is a combination rerelease of Pecker Power and Instant Rasta, two albums recorded by Japanese percussionist Pecker in conjunction with Jamaican musicians. It’s an interesting effort, combining a certain Jamaican rawness with a sophisticated Japanese surface, and it certainly comes equipped with the reggae muscle to kick it along – Sly & Robbie on the one hand, and the Wailers band on the other, and both Channel One and Tuff Gong studios (if only they’d managed Federal as well, but that might have meant the Dragonaires as a backing band).

I’m not sure exactly how much of Pecker’s work is really being heard on this album, but that really isn’t the point – the point is more that it’s a good reggae and dub set. ROIR is the home of some killer reggae, and this album is no exception to Neil Cooper’s rule. I’d consider “21st Century Dub” a must-have for any dub fan, great or small.

“Some of the best dub of all time. This complete reissue of two Japanese LP’s (‘Pecker Power’ and ‘Instant Rasta’) combines the best of classic mid-70’s dub (Joe Gibbs ‘African Series’, Pablo, Tubby styles) with the best in technological advances. Quite simply, classic.” – Peter Wright (now GM of Rykodisc) 1987
From ROIR site:
“An amazing but true story about an experimental dub session organized by BOB MARLEY in Jamaica in 1979!!!

In 1979 during a visit to Japan, Bob Marley met the acclaimed Japanese percussionist Pecker. Pecker, a big fan of reggae, convinced Marley to bring top Japanese musicians (mostly members of The Yellow Magic Orchestra) to Jamaica to mix it up with the cream of Jamaican reggae artists, to jam and play out in informal dub sessions at both Channel One and Tuff Gong Studios. The astounding results were released only in Japan on two separate LP’s in 1980.”

Tracklist:
1. Pecker – Mystical Cosmic Vibrations (5:24)
2. Pecker – International Orchitis (4:10)
3. Pecker – Pecker Power Part Two (1:25)
4. Pecker – Pecker Power Part One (5:07)
5. Pecker – Concrete Jungle (5:11)
6. Pecker – Militant Sniff (4:27)
7. Pecker – Jamming (4:11)
8. Pecker – Mystical Electro Harakiri (5:02)
9. Pecker – Beggar Suite Part 1 (4:54)
10. Pecker – Beggar Suite Part 2 (3:32)
11. Pecker – Beggar Suite Part 3 (2:49)
12. Pecker – Dub Jam Rock (4:50)
13. Pecker – Kylyn (6:42)
14. Pecker – Dr. Dr. Humanity (1:18)
21st Century Dub (Roir, 1980)
(192 kbps, small front cover included)

Sonia Pottinger is not only one of the few women producers in Jamaica, but, also one of the most successful. Three of her productions were included on a list of top 100 Jamaican hits of all time compiled by Clinton Lindsay of WNWK-FM in New York. Joe White’s 1968 recording of “Every Night” was listed as number 40, while Delano Stewart’s 1968 single of “That’s Life” placed 86, and Marcia Griffith’s 1976 single of “Dreamland” placed 98. Pottinger was also responsible for recordings by Judy Mowatt, Sister Carol, and Culture, many of which were released on her High Note label. Pottinger proved adept at recruiting talented session musicians for her recordings. Among the musicians that she used were Sly Dunbar, Robbie Shakespeare, Ernest Ranglin, Earl “Wire” Lindo, Dean Fraser, Roland Alphonso, and Count Ossie. Pottinger has also been involved with the Heartbeat label. Sonia Pottinger died on 3 November 2010 in Kingston, Jamaica.

In an industry dominated by a handful of male producers, Sonia Pottinger emerged during the rocksteady and early reggae years of the late ’60s to cut songs worthy of the competition. Often recording at Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle studio and employing Lynn Taitt & the Jets as a backup band, Pottinger mostly focused on vocal tracks by both solo singers and harmony groups. This fine compilation on Attack features many classic examples, including the Gaylads’ “Hard to Confess,” the Melodians’ “Little Nut Tree” and “Swing and Dine,” Ken Boothe’s “Say You,” and Monty Morris’ title track. Reflecting Pottinger’s breadth, the disc also includes an early DJ side by Charlie Ace, a rudeboy standard by the Valentines, and some calypso and nyahbinghi-inspired work by Patsy and the Basie Band.

VA – Sonia Pottinger´s Rocksteady – Put On Your Best Dress
(192 kbps, front cover included)

Sonia Pottinger is not only one of the few women producers in Jamaica, but, also one of the most successful. Three of her productions were included on a list of top 100 Jamaican hits of all time compiled by Clinton Lindsay of WNWK-FM in New York. Joe White’s 1968 recording of “Every Night” was listed as number 40, while Delano Stewart’s 1968 single of “That’s Life” placed 86, and Marcia Griffith’s 1976 single of “Dreamland” placed 98. Pottinger was also responsible for recordings by Judy Mowatt, Sister Carol, and Culture, many of which were released on her High Note label. Pottinger proved adept at recruiting talented session musicians for her recordings. Among the musicians that she used were Sly Dunbar, Robbie Shakespeare, Ernest Ranglin, Earl “Wire” Lindo, Dean Fraser, Roland Alphonso, and Count Ossie. Pottinger has also been involved with the Heartbeat label. Sonia Pottinger died on 3 November 2010 in Kingston, Jamaica.

In an industry dominated by a handful of male producers, Sonia Pottinger emerged during the rocksteady and early reggae years of the late ’60s to cut songs worthy of the competition. Often recording at Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle studio and employing Lynn Taitt & the Jets as a backup band, Pottinger mostly focused on vocal tracks by both solo singers and harmony groups. This fine compilation on Attack features many classic examples, including the Gaylads’ “Hard to Confess,” the Melodians’ “Little Nut Tree” and “Swing and Dine,” Ken Boothe’s “Say You,” and Monty Morris’ title track. Reflecting Pottinger’s breadth, the disc also includes an early DJ side by Charlie Ace, a rudeboy standard by the Valentines, and some calypso and nyahbinghi-inspired work by Patsy and the Basie Band.

VA – Sonia Pottinger´s Rocksteady – Put On Your Best Dress
(192 kbps, front cover included)

Kalyi Jag (Black Fire) is a group formed in Budapest in 1978 by young Gypsies from Szatmár county. They play authentic Gypsy music, sung in Romany and Hungarian. Kalyi Jag consists of: Gusztáv Varga – voice, guitar Ágnes Künstler – voice József Balogh – voice, tambura, guitar, spoon József Nagy – water can, oral bass.

They are recognised as one of the foremost Gypsy folk ensembles in Eastern Europe today.

This is one of their early LPs released on Hungaroton Records in 1989 and features guitar, jug, whistle, oral bass, water can etc..

Tracklist:

1. Parne gada szi pe late (2:07)
2. Lungoj o drom angla mande (2:42)
3. Muri klaca kocsakenca (2:14)
4. Lina (5:09)
5. Aj, Dévale Koj Odi (3:53)
6. Pánzs kolompiri ande tigalya (2:26)
7. Ustyen Opre, Romále (3:05)
8. Le csurara mol na pena (3:26)
9. Kerkoj aba muro jilo (2:50)
10. Anta, romnyej, mure roulya (3:07)
11. Szájbőgő improvizáció (2:04)
12. Szar Csiriklyi (4:37)
13. Beng hhuklyasz ande roulyi (1:38)
14. Sápä szärátä ás mänká (3:01)
15. Kutyka téle, ko lahhikao kopácsi (2:13)
16. Csorro Joka (2:43)
17. Könyörgés (3:10)

01 She has a white dress on
02 I have still a long way to go
03 My trousers are buttoned all along
04 Lina
05 Oh, my God, who is there
06 There are five potatoes in the pot
07 Get up, Gypsies
08 Shieve-makers do not drink wine
09 My Heart Is Heavy
10 Give, woman, my stick to me
11 Oral bass improvisations
12 Like birds
13 The devil has hidden in my stick
14 I would eat salten onions
15 Over there under a little tree
16 Poor Joska
17 Song for Mercy

Kalyi Jag – Lungoj O Drom Angla Mande
(192 kbps, front cover included)

Esther Béjarano (born 15 December 1924 in Saarlouis) is among the last survivors of the Girl orchestra of Auschwitz.

Béjarano was born as Esther Loewy as a daughter of the Head Cantor of a Jewish municipality. The father encouraged his daughter to get interested in music and Esther learned to play the piano. At age 15 she had to separate from her parents, in order to prepare for emigration to Palestine. This emigration was thrwarted by the Nazis. She carried out two years of hard labour in Neuendorf Labour Camp close to Fürstenwalde/Spree. On 20 April 1943 all members of the labour camp were deported to Auschwitz. There she had to drag stones until she joined the Girl orchestra of Auschwitz. In the orchestra, she played the accordion. The orchestra had the task of playing for the daily march of the prisoners through the camp gate. She survived Auschwitz and was brought to the concentration camp Ravensbrück. She had the chance to excape on a “death march” in March, 1945. She emigrated to Palestine and returned later to Germany. At the beginning of the 1980s, with her daughter Edna and son Joram, she created the musical group “Coincidence”. They sing songs from the ghetto and Jewish as well as anti-fascist songs. Béjarano lives today in Hamburg. She is a co-founder and chairman of the International Auschwitz Committee and honorary chaiman of the Union of Persecutees of the Nazi Regime. She was awarded the Carl von Ossietzky medal and holds the Cross of Merit, First class of the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany.

In the last years, Esther Bejarano recorded an antifascist album along with the hip hop crew “Microphone Mafia”.

Esther Bejarano:
“I had great luck that in the block, in which I stayed overnight. One evening, Mrs. Tschaikowska, a Polish music teacher, was looking for women who could play an instrument. The SS had instructed her to set up a girl orchestra. I introduced myself, said that I could play piano. We do not have a piano here, said Mrs. Tschaikowska. If you can play accordion, I will audition you. I had never played an accordion before. I had to try, so I would not have to haul boulders any more. I said to her that I could play also accordion. She instructed me to play Du hast Glück bei den Frauen, Bel Ami, a popular German song. I knew this song, asked her for a few minutes of patience, so I could warm up. It was like a miracle. I played the song, even with accompaniment, and was accepted to the orchestra with two friends. (…)
The function of the girl orchestra in Auschwitz-Birkenau was to stand at the gate and play when the gangs marched out in the morning and in the evening, and when they returned to the camp. We all had a bad conscience, because we “helped”, so to speak, that the prisoners had to march in step, had to march to our music.
But there was worse. The SS instructed us to stand at the gate and play when new transports arrived, in which innumerable Jewish people from all parts of Europe sat, trains that were led to the tracks that went right to the gas chambers and where everyone was gassed. The people waved at us, they thought certainly, where music is played, it certainly can’t be that bad. Those were the tactics of the Nazis. They wanted all the people to go to their deaths without a fight. But we knew where they were being led. We played with tears in our eyes. There was nothing we could do to resist because the SS henchmen were standing behind us with their rifles.”

Here´s the album “Vögel träumen auf den Zweigen – Lieder aus dem Widerstand”, recorded in 1987 in Hamburg. Esther Bejarano is accompanied by Edna and Joram Bejarano and some other musicians. The play wonderful jewish songs like “Jisrolek”, “Sog nischt kejnmol”, “Dos kelbl” and “Mir lebn ejbig”. On this album are furthermore two Eisler songs, “Zu ejns, zwaj, draj” and his collaboration with Bertolt Brecht, “Ballade von der `Judenhure´ Marie Sanders.

Esther Bejarano – Vögel träumen auf den Zweigen – Lieder aus dem Widerstand
(192 kbps, vinyl rip, front cover included)

More infos about Esther Bejarano can be found via http://sunday-news.wider-des-vergessens.de/?p=4963 or http://www.badische-zeitung.de/ausland-1/es-ist-laengst-nicht-gut–62383916.html.

Savoy compiled these solid blues and boogie woogie sides, including tracks by Tiny Bradshaw, Gatemouth Moore, and others.

While these tracks are available elsewhere, “Blues N’ Boogie” is still a nice budget-priced introduction to some raw, postwar sounds. A fince colletion of hard rockin´ early R´n´B!!!

Tracklist:
1. Man Eater – Big Jay McNeely & His Blue Jays
2. Double Faced Deacon – Tommy Brown
3. Did You Ever Love A Woman – Gatemouth Moore
4. I Want To Rock – Little Miss Sharecropper
5. Bookie’s Blues – H-Bomb Ferguson
6. The Rainy Day Blues – Sonny Wilson
7. Airplane Blues – Helen Humes
8. You’re The Greatest – Dallas Bartley
9. My Good Pott – Doc Pomus
10. Fine Brown Frame – Milton Buggs
11. Take The Hands Off The Clock – Tiny Bradshaw & His Orchestra
12. I Know What It’s All About – Dallas Bartley & His Band
13. I’m Still In Love With You – Melvin Moore
14. Married Woman’s Boogie – Billy Wright
15. My New Chick – Doc Pomus Listen Listen
16. I Ain’t Mad At You Pretty Baby – Gatemouth Moore
17. V-8 Baby – Tommy Brown
18. Helen’s Advice – Helen Humes

VA – Savoy Blues´N´Boogie
(192 kbps, small front cover included)

Image

Of the early stars of MPB (musica popular brasileira), Chico Buarque was one of the first to become a certifiable pop star. With his warm, nasally croon, elegant phrasing, and considerable skill at lyric writing, Buarque (who is handsome to boot) became extremely popular with women, who loved his understated sensuality. However, Buarque was uncomfortable playing the role of pop star preferring to be seen as a serious artist. Throughout his career he’s managed to have the best of both worlds, but not without some significant bumps along the way. Still, he remains a towering figure in Brazilian pop music, one of the country’s greatest singer-songwriters and interpreters of the samba.

Born in Rio de Janeiro in 1944, Buarque spent his early youth in Sao Paulo and Italy. Upon returning to Brazil, Buarque artistic development was greatly enhanced by the friends of his father (the historian Sergio Buarque de Holanda) who were prominent in the early bossa nova movement. Although he immersed himself in music, specifically the new bossa nova sounds of Joao Gilberto, Buarque decided that a college education was more practical and he decided to study architecture at the University of Sao Paulo. That turned out to be a short-lived career choice and it wasn’t long before Buarque was cutting classes and hanging out with Sao Paulo’s bossa nova cognoscenti.

Buarque was 21 when his career began to take off. He recorded the single “Pedro Pedreiro,” composed music for a theatrical production and, perhaps most importantly, had three of his compositions recorded by the undisputed queen of bossa nova Nara Leao. Not an openly polemical performer, Buarque’s material did not lack social consciousness, but it did seem stylistically conservative when compared to the late 60s sounds of the tropicalistas such as Caetano Veloso, Gilberto Gil, and Os Mutantes. Despite the charges of aesthetic conservatism leveled against him (by Gil and Veloso) Buarque took a huge career chance in 1968 writing and scoring a bleak, existential play entitled “Roda Viva” that was critical of obsessive fan culture. The play’s pop star protagonist is torn limb from limb, his flesh consumed by his fans. In a move that sounds lifted from Julian Beck’s radical Living Theater, the performers would offer the audience pieces of the dead pop star’s flesh to eat (it was chicken meat). Needless to say, with a military dictatorship in power this was considered extremely controversial stuff and soldiers were sent out to disrupt performances of “Roda Viva”, which including destroying sets and assaulting performers, Buarque himself was jailed briefly.

After the disaster of “Roda Viva” Buarque returned to Italy for a year only to return to Brazil to find most of the stars of tropicalia in exile or severely circumscribed by government censorship. In 1971 he recorded the album “Construction” which was decided break from his earlier bossa nova records. This was the star of the second half of Buarque’s career that saw him writing more intense songs that underneath each complicated lyrical layer was social and political protest. Forced to submit his material to government censors, nearly two-thirds of his material was rejected. And from 1974-1975 the censors approved almost nothing he wrote. On a more positive note the rift between Buarque, Veloso and Gil was settled upon their return to Brazil in 1972 and Buarque went on to record with both of them in the mid-70s. In the 80s, Buarque was given more compositional leeway and recorded some stunning music, along with branching out into other artist endeavors that included writing plays and novels, as well as scoring films, all of this work consistent with his desire to re-examine Brazil’s cultural past, it relationship with the present, and its limitless possibilities for the future.

For over 30 years Chico Buarque has been an artist that struggled with pop music and pop stardom. Always challenging, always conscious of cultural history, he remains, deservedly so, a towering figure in Brazilian music.

Chico Buarque together with some other artists did a remarkable rebuilding of Brechts “Threepenny Opera” for the theatre play “Opera do Malandro”. The music is somewhat “tropicalized”, but the lyrics are a straight transfer from Brechts work. The music presented here is the soundtrack of the theatre play, not the music of the same titled film with a slightly different soundtrack.

Chico Buarque – Ópera do Malandro (Weill/Brecht)
(192 kbps, small front cover included)

With a big thank you to Verde!

Tracks:
01. O Malandro (Die Moritat von Mackie Messer – Kurt Weill & Bertolt Brecht, version written by Chico Buarque, performed by MPB-4)
02. Hino de Duran (Performed by C.Buarque)
03. Viver do Amor (Performed by Marlene)
04. Uma Canção Desnaturada (Performed by C. Buarque & Marlene)
05. Tango do Covil (Performed by MPB-4)
06. Doze Anos (Performed by C.Buarque & Moreira da Silva)
07. O Casamento dos Pequenos Burgueses (Performed by C.Buarque & Alcione)
08. Teresinha (Performed by Zizi Possi)
09. Homenagem ao Malandro (Performed by Moreira da Silva)
10. Folhetim (Performed by Nara Leão)
11. Ai, se Eles me Pegam Agora (Performed by Frenéticas)
12. O Meu Amor (Performed by Marieta Severo & Elba Ramalho
13. Se Eu Fosse o Teu Patrão (Performed by Turma do Funil)
14. Geni e o Zepelim (Performed by Gal Costa & Francis Hime)
15. Pedaço de Mim (Performed by Gal Costa & Francis Hime)
16. Ópera (Part of Verdi’s Rigoletto, Aida, La Traviata; Bizet’s Carmen and Wagner’s Tannhauser. Adaptation by Chico Buarque.)
17. O Malandro n. 2 (“Die Moritat von Mackie Messer” – Kurt Weill & Bertolt Brecht, version written by Chico Buarque, performed by João Nogueira)


“Los Anarquistas 1904 – 1936” is a record of marches and songs of the struggles of the anarchist workers in Argentinia (1904-1936). It was ripped from an LP, so the file has only two tracks, side A and B.

Tracklist:
1-Hijo Del Pueblo (anarchist anthem)
2-Recitado (letter to the anarchists when starting their actions in the early twentieth century)
3-Milonga Social Del Payador Libertario (anonymous1902)
4-Milonga Anarquista (anonymous 1906)
5-La Verbena Anarquista (anonymous 1905)
6-Este Y Aquel. (lyrics by F. Gualtieri 1923)
7-Guajiras Rojas (anonymous 1918)
8-Marsellesa (anonymous 1907)
9-Semana Trágica (lyrics by F.Gualtieri 1919)
10-Maldita Burguesía (Habanera) (anonymous 1907)
11-Maldición De Un Maldito  (F. Gualtieri 1926)
12-Guitarra Roja (Martín Castro 1928)
13-Guerra A La Burguesía (Tango, anonymous 1901)
14-El Deportado (anonymous 1920)
15-El Héroe
16-Sacco Y Venzetti (Martín Castro 1928)
17-A Las Barricadas (Hymn of the anarchists in the spanish civil war)

Los Anarquistas – 1004 – 1936
(192 kbps, cover art included)

You will find the lyrics on this website: http://pacoweb.net/Cantatas/Anarco.htm

 

“Los Anarquistas 1904 – 1936” is a record of marches and songs of the struggles of the anarchist workers in Argentinia (1904-1936). It was ripped from an LP, so the file has only two tracks, side A and B.

Tracklist:
1-Hijo Del Pueblo (anarchist anthem)
2-Recitado (letter to the anarchists when starting their actions in the early twentieth century)
3-Milonga Social Del Payador Libertario (anonymous1902)
4-Milonga Anarquista (anonymous 1906)
5-La Verbena Anarquista (anonymous 1905)
6-Este Y Aquel. (lyrics by F. Gualtieri 1923)
7-Guajiras Rojas (anonymous 1918)
8-Marsellesa (anonymous 1907)
9-Semana Trágica (lyrics by F.Gualtieri 1919)
10-Maldita Burguesía (Habanera) (anonymous 1907)
11-Maldición De Un Maldito  (F. Gualtieri 1926)
12-Guitarra Roja (Martín Castro 1928)
13-Guerra A La Burguesía (Tango, anonymous 1901)
14-El Deportado (anonymous 1920)
15-El Héroe
16-Sacco Y Venzetti (Martín Castro 1928)
17-A Las Barricadas (Hymn of the anarchists in the spanish civil war)

Los Anarquistas – 1004 – 1936
(192 kbps, cover art included)

You will find the lyrics on this website: http://pacoweb.net/Cantatas/Anarco.htm