Archive for November, 2010


Lloyd Barnes (born in 1944 in Jamaica), popularly known as Bullwackie, is the founder of the independent record label Wackies, specialized in Jamaican music.

Barnes was a protégé of Prince Buster, and recorded several singles during the 1960s. Lloyd Barnes worked for Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle label as an engineer before emigrating to The Bronx, New York in the early 1970s. Here he founded the Wackie’s House Of Music record store and behind this shop-front was the first significant reggae studio and label in the United States. The Bullwackie’s and Wackies labels followed, along with other imprints such as Senrab, Hamma, and Senta, and during the late 1970s and early 1980s he produced artists such as Horace Andy, Sugar Minott, Junior Byles, Roland Alphonso, Tyrone Evans, and Lee “Scratch” Perry.
Later productions included work by Jackie Mittoo. Barnes also operated a sound system which he used as an outlet for the Wackies recordings.
The album “Wackies Rhythm Force – Free South Africa ” , recorded and mixed in New York, was released in 1986.
Tracks:
A1   In South Africa
A2   African Children
A3   Time Fe The African Be Free
A4   Majority Rule
A5   Chant Down Apartheid
A6   Now You See The Scene
B1   Liberation Struggles
B2   Peoples Republic
B3   Black Solidarity
B4   City Of Gold
B5   Detention And Repression
B6   Free South Africa

Wackies Rhythm Force – Free South Africa (1986)
(192 kbps, front cover included)

Advertisements

Lloyd Barnes (born in 1944 in Jamaica), popularly known as Bullwackie, is the founder of the independent record label Wackies, specialized in Jamaican music.

Barnes was a protégé of Prince Buster, and recorded several singles during the 1960s. Lloyd Barnes worked for Duke Reid’s Treasure Isle label as an engineer before emigrating to The Bronx, New York in the early 1970s. Here he founded the Wackie’s House Of Music record store and behind this shop-front was the first significant reggae studio and label in the United States. The Bullwackie’s and Wackies labels followed, along with other imprints such as Senrab, Hamma, and Senta, and during the late 1970s and early 1980s he produced artists such as Horace Andy, Sugar Minott, Junior Byles, Roland Alphonso, Tyrone Evans, and Lee “Scratch” Perry.
Later productions included work by Jackie Mittoo. Barnes also operated a sound system which he used as an outlet for the Wackies recordings.
The album “Wackies Rhythm Force – Free South Africa ” , recorded and mixed in New York, was released in 1986.
Tracks:
A1   In South Africa
A2   African Children
A3   Time Fe The African Be Free
A4   Majority Rule
A5   Chant Down Apartheid
A6   Now You See The Scene
B1   Liberation Struggles
B2   Peoples Republic
B3   Black Solidarity
B4   City Of Gold
B5   Detention And Repression
B6   Free South Africa

Wackies Rhythm Force – Free South Africa (1986)
(192 kbps, front cover included)

One of the dancehall era’s few successful female DJs, Sister Carol was something like reggae’s answer to Queen Latifah: a strong, positive feminist voice who was inspired by her faith and never resorted to sexual posturing to win an audience. Leaning heavily on socially conscious material, Sister Carol delivered uplifting and cautionary messages drawn from her Rastafarian principles, while always urging respect for women.

She was more of a singjay than a full-time toaster, capable of melodic vocals as well as solid rhymes. Never quite a commercial powerhouse, she nonetheless enjoyed a lengthy career and general critical approval.

Sister Carol was born Carol East in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1959, and grew up in the city’s Denham Town ghetto. Her father worked in the music industry as a radio engineer, and in 1973, he moved the family to Brooklyn in search of work. Carol got involved in New York’s thriving Jamaican music scene, and tried her hand at singing; however, music wasn’t a career prospect yet, as Carol earned a degree in education from CCNY and gave birth to the first of four children in 1981. Not long before the latter event, she met Jamaican DJ Brigadier Jerry, who inspired her to try her hand at dancehall-style DJ chatting rather than singing. She developed rapidly under Jerry’s mentorship, winning talent competitions in both New York and Jamaica, and toured as an opening act for the Meditations. Her first album, “Liberation for Africa”, was released in limited quantities on a small label the following year. Recorded for the Jah Life label, 1984’s “Black Cinderella” was the album that established Sister Carol in the international reggae community, featuring the title track (her signature song) and “Oh Jah (Mi Ready).”

Carol subsequently formed her own Black Cinderella label, which gave her an immediate outlet for single releases in the years to come. Most notably, she cut a cover of Bob Marley´s “Screwface” in tandem with onetime I-Three Judy Mowatt, who issued the single on her own Ashandan label. It took Carol several years to come up with another LP, however, as she briefly turned to an acting career; she earned supporting roles in two Jonathan Demme comedies, 1986’s “Something Wild” (which included her soundtrack cut “Wild Thing”) and 1988’s “Married to the Mob”.

Sister Carol -Liberation For Africa (1983)
(160 kbps, front cover included)

One of the dancehall era’s few successful female DJs, Sister Carol was something like reggae’s answer to Queen Latifah: a strong, positive feminist voice who was inspired by her faith and never resorted to sexual posturing to win an audience. Leaning heavily on socially conscious material, Sister Carol delivered uplifting and cautionary messages drawn from her Rastafarian principles, while always urging respect for women.

She was more of a singjay than a full-time toaster, capable of melodic vocals as well as solid rhymes. Never quite a commercial powerhouse, she nonetheless enjoyed a lengthy career and general critical approval.

Sister Carol was born Carol East in Kingston, Jamaica, in 1959, and grew up in the city’s Denham Town ghetto. Her father worked in the music industry as a radio engineer, and in 1973, he moved the family to Brooklyn in search of work. Carol got involved in New York’s thriving Jamaican music scene, and tried her hand at singing; however, music wasn’t a career prospect yet, as Carol earned a degree in education from CCNY and gave birth to the first of four children in 1981. Not long before the latter event, she met Jamaican DJ Brigadier Jerry, who inspired her to try her hand at dancehall-style DJ chatting rather than singing. She developed rapidly under Jerry’s mentorship, winning talent competitions in both New York and Jamaica, and toured as an opening act for the Meditations. Her first album, “Liberation for Africa”, was released in limited quantities on a small label the following year. Recorded for the Jah Life label, 1984’s “Black Cinderella” was the album that established Sister Carol in the international reggae community, featuring the title track (her signature song) and “Oh Jah (Mi Ready).”

Carol subsequently formed her own Black Cinderella label, which gave her an immediate outlet for single releases in the years to come. Most notably, she cut a cover of Bob Marley´s “Screwface” in tandem with onetime I-Three Judy Mowatt, who issued the single on her own Ashandan label. It took Carol several years to come up with another LP, however, as she briefly turned to an acting career; she earned supporting roles in two Jonathan Demme comedies, 1986’s “Something Wild” (which included her soundtrack cut “Wild Thing”) and 1988’s “Married to the Mob”.

Sister Carol -Liberation For Africa (1983)
(160 kbps, front cover included)

The music festival “Rock für den Frieden” (“Rock for Peace”), which was held annually from 1982 to 1987 at “Palast der Republik” in East Berlin, was one of the highlights of the GDR rock scene. It was organised by the “Zentralrat der FDJ” and the “Komitee für Unterhaltungskunst der DDR”.

With this state-sponsored music festival, SED youth functionaries and the rock scene arrived at an arrangement based on the lowest common denominator: anxiety about survival in the face of a possible nuclear war. Because the festival quickly devolved into an empty ritual filled with conformist political songs and forced ceremonies, more and more East German bands refused to participate.

These songs were recorded between January, 28th and 30th 1983 at the Palast der Republik.

Tracklist:
1. Berluc – No Bomb
2. Puhdys – Computer-Karriere
3. Dialog – Eigentlich
4. Gruppe WIR – Blutiger Sommer
5. City – Sag mir, wo die Blumen sind
6. NO 55 – Das war´s
7. Katrin Lindner & Schubert-Band – Nachkriegskinder
8. Karat – Wie weit fliegt die Taube
9. Silly – Ein Lied für die Menschen

VA – Rock für den Frieden (Amiga, 1983, vinyl rip)
(256 kbps, front & back cover included)

The music festival “Rock für den Frieden” (“Rock for Peace”), which was held annually from 1982 to 1987 at “Palast der Republik” in East Berlin, was one of the highlights of the GDR rock scene. It was organised by the “Zentralrat der FDJ” and the “Komitee für Unterhaltungskunst der DDR”.

With this state-sponsored music festival, SED youth functionaries and the rock scene arrived at an arrangement based on the lowest common denominator: anxiety about survival in the face of a possible nuclear war. Because the festival quickly devolved into an empty ritual filled with conformist political songs and forced ceremonies, more and more East German bands refused to participate.

These songs were recorded between January, 28th and 30th 1983 at the Palast der Republik.

Tracklist:
1. Berluc – No Bomb
2. Puhdys – Computer-Karriere
3. Dialog – Eigentlich
4. Gruppe WIR – Blutiger Sommer
5. City – Sag mir, wo die Blumen sind
6. NO 55 – Das war´s
7. Katrin Lindner & Schubert-Band – Nachkriegskinder
8. Karat – Wie weit fliegt die Taube
9. Silly – Ein Lied für die Menschen

VA – Rock für den Frieden (Amiga, 1983, vinyl rip)
(256 kbps, front & back cover included)

The sound quality on this bootleg is very good. Most of the 1970 material is available through the CBS Studios Reference Recording archives. It was produced by Bob Johnson. This session also produced the “If Not For You” version that was released on the official  “The Bootleg Series Vol. 1-3”. Produced by Bob Johnson as well, this session was three days after the “Nashville Skyline “LP was recorded in the same studio, with different musicians. The cover art is from a very rare 1973 Japanese CBS / Sony 7” vinyl single release of “A Fool Such As I b/w Lily Of The West”. It was drawn by Japanese artist Nov Yabuki.

Tracks:

Nashville, 1969:
Ghost Riders In The Sky
Cupid
All I Have To Do Is Dream
Gates Of Eden
I Threw It All Away
I Don’t Believe You
Matchbox (Carl Perkins)
Your True Love (Carl Perkins)
Las Vegas Blues +
Fishing Blues (fragment) (Henry Thomas)
Honey Just Allow Me One More Chance
Rainy Day Women #12 & 35

New York, 1970:
Song To Woody
Mama You Been On My Mind *
Don’t Think Twice [inst]*
Yesterday (Lennon/McCartney) *
Just Like Tom Thumb’s Blues *
Da Doo Ron Ron (Barry/Spector)*
One Too Many Mornings [inst]*
One Too Many Mornings *
Bonus:
Folsom Prison Blues (J. Cash)
Ring Of Fire (Carter/Kilgore)

The 1969 material includes:
Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, and Billy Wotten (guitars) Marshall Grant (bass)
W.S. Holland (drums).

The 1970 sessions include:
George Harrison (guitar)
Charlie Daniels (bass & backing vocals)
Billy Mundi (drums)
*Bob Johnson (piano)

+ It is unknown whether this spontaneous Dylan song is copyrighted. The working title is also unknown.
Björner refers to it as Telephone Wire
Krogsgaard calls it Las Vegas Blues
Heylin uses the title When’s My Swamp Gonna Catch Fire?

Source / Venue:
CBS Studio Nashville, TN May 3, 1969
CBS Studio B, NYC May 1, 1970
Bonus:
Columbia Records Studio, Nashville, TN May 3, 1969

No link.

Ramblin’ Jack Elliott is one of folk music’s most enduring characters. Since he first came on the scene in the late ’50s, Elliott influenced everyone from Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger to the Rolling Stones and the Grateful Dead. The son of a New York doctor and a onetime traveling companion of Woody Guthrie, Elliott used his self-made cowboy image to bring his love of folk music to one generation after another. Despite the countless miles that Elliott traveled, his nickname is derived from his unique verbiage: an innocent question often led to a mosaic of stories before he got to the answer. According to folk songstress Odetta, it was her mother who gave Elliott the name when she remarked, “Oh, that Jack Elliott, he sure can ramble.”

Elliott’s recording debut came in the mid-’50s when he recorded three songs for a multi-artist compilation, “Bad Men, Heroes and Pirates”, released by Elektra. Elliott was so influenced by Guthrie (whom he had met during a Greenwich Village picking session in 1950) that he began his musical career by mimicking the legendary folksinger. When Guthrie traveled to Florida in 1952, he sent for Elliott to join him. By the time Elliott arrived, however, Guthrie had already left for Mexico, where he was turned back at the border and forced to return to New York. Elliott reunited with Guthrie a few months later. In the winter of 1954, they traveled together back to Florida; in the spring of 1954, they continued on to California’s Topanga Canyon. The trip marked the last time that Elliott saw a healthy Guthrie. When he went to Europe in 1955, Elliott sang Guthrie’s songs and told stories about him. England provided the setting for Elliott’s early success; his first album on his own, Woody Guthrie’s Blues, was recorded in England for the Topic label. In addition to recording four more albums for Topic, he attracted attention with his performances with Derroll Adams, a banjo player he had met in California. The duo barnstormed throughout Europe and had a profound influence on the British music scene.

Here´s his Topic album from 1958 released in Great Britain on a 10-inch LP.

Ramblin´ Jack Elliott – Jack Takes The Floor (Topic, 1958, vinyl rip)
(192 kbps, cover art included)

Ramblin’ Jack Elliott is one of folk music’s most enduring characters. Since he first came on the scene in the late ’50s, Elliott influenced everyone from Bob Dylan and Pete Seeger to the Rolling Stones and the Grateful Dead. The son of a New York doctor and a onetime traveling companion of Woody Guthrie, Elliott used his self-made cowboy image to bring his love of folk music to one generation after another. Despite the countless miles that Elliott traveled, his nickname is derived from his unique verbiage: an innocent question often led to a mosaic of stories before he got to the answer. According to folk songstress Odetta, it was her mother who gave Elliott the name when she remarked, “Oh, that Jack Elliott, he sure can ramble.”

Elliott’s recording debut came in the mid-’50s when he recorded three songs for a multi-artist compilation, “Bad Men, Heroes and Pirates”, released by Elektra. Elliott was so influenced by Guthrie (whom he had met during a Greenwich Village picking session in 1950) that he began his musical career by mimicking the legendary folksinger. When Guthrie traveled to Florida in 1952, he sent for Elliott to join him. By the time Elliott arrived, however, Guthrie had already left for Mexico, where he was turned back at the border and forced to return to New York. Elliott reunited with Guthrie a few months later. In the winter of 1954, they traveled together back to Florida; in the spring of 1954, they continued on to California’s Topanga Canyon. The trip marked the last time that Elliott saw a healthy Guthrie. When he went to Europe in 1955, Elliott sang Guthrie’s songs and told stories about him. England provided the setting for Elliott’s early success; his first album on his own, Woody Guthrie’s Blues, was recorded in England for the Topic label. In addition to recording four more albums for Topic, he attracted attention with his performances with Derroll Adams, a banjo player he had met in California. The duo barnstormed throughout Europe and had a profound influence on the British music scene.

Here´s his Topic album from 1958 released in Great Britain on a 10-inch LP.

Ramblin´ Jack Elliott – Jack Takes The Floor (Topic, 1958, vinyl rip)
(192 kbps, cover art included)

The sound quality is excellent. Very clear, very clean, very enjoyable. The liner notes claim this release is in ‘superior sound quality’… it is… it’s great! Nice early black and white pictures, and a classy layout. The set also contains a lovely fold out booklet with a bit of a story behind the tapes. It’s well written and informative. The title, of course, reflects that the tunes were recorded in Bonnie Beecher’s apartment.

This was actually the first bootleg ever produced. It was released on a 2 LP set in 1969, and went by the title ‘Great White Wonder’. One of the most famous bootlegs of all time. This is the first bootleg ever to be produced in the rock-and-roll era. Great White Wonder was originally released in the United States in July of 1969. There was little on this piece to identify it to the world. It came out in a blank white gatefold cover, with blank white labels. The only identifying mark whatsoever is the matrix number: GF 001/2/3/4. (gwa 1Aa version 1). The name ‘Great White Wonder’ probably actually began as a joke when retailers needed to come up with a name for this blank white album. The term quickly became synonymous with Dylan in the bootleg world however, and has since been used many, many times to refer to either the man or his work.

“Songs For Bonnie”
source: “Minnesota Hotel Tape” 1961
Recorded in Bonnie Beecher’s apartment.
Superb sound quality, but a couple of noticeable
glitches are present on the original.

01 Candy Man (Rev. Gary Davis arr. of trad. song)
02 Baby Please Don’t Go (Big Joe Williams)
03 Hard Times In New York Town (adapted)
04 Stealin’ (Memphis Jug Band arr. of trad. song)
05 Poor Lazarus (Traditional)
06 I Ain’t Got No Home (Woody Guthrie)
07 It’s Hard To Be Blind (adapted)
08 Dink’s Song (John & Alan Lomax arr. of trad. song)
09 Man Of Constant Sorrow (Dylan arr. of trad. song)
10 Naomi Wise (Traditional)
11 Wade In The Water (Traditional)
12 I Was Young When I Left Home (adapted)
13 In The Evening (Leroy Carr)
14 Baby Let Me Follow You Down (E.Von Schmidt)
15 Sally Gal (adapted)
16 Gospel Plow (Traditional)
17 Long John (Traditional)
18 Cocaine Blues (Rev. Gary Davis arr. of trad. song)
19 VD Blues (Woody Guthrie)
20 VD Waltz (Woody Guthrie)
21 VD City (Woody Guthrie)
22 VD Gunner’s Blues (Woody Guthrie)
23 See My Grave’s Kept Clean (Lemon Jefferson)
24 Ramblin’ Round (Woody Guthrie)
25 Black Cross (Lord Buckley arr. of Joseph S. Newman)

No link.