Archive for March, 2013


This album was released in Santiago de Chile to celebrate the second anniversary of the Unidad Popular government.

It includes performances by some of the most important songwriters and folk musicians of the era, such as Victor Jara, Quilapayun, Inti-Illimani, Angel Parra and Patricio Manns. Between the songs there are narrations by Cesar Aguilera accompanied by Pancho Navarro on guitar.

 

The album was released in 1972 by the IRT label.

Tracklist:

01. Chile Pueblo – César Aguilera & Pancho Navarro
02. Cuando amanece el día – Ángel Parra
03. Chile Cobre – César Aguilera & Pancho Navarro
04. Nuestro cobre – Quilapayún
05. Chile Carbón – César Aguilera & Pancho Navarro
06. En Lota la noche es brava – Patricio Manns
07. Chile Mar – César Aguilera & Pancho Navarro
08. Boga, boga – Manguaré
09. Chile Textil – César Aguilera & Pancho Navarro
10. Obreras del telar – Víctor Jara
11. Chile Tierra – César Aguilera & Pancho Navarro
12. Chacarero – Quilmay
13. Chile Banco – César Aguilera & Pancho Navarro
14. Ni pocos, ni muchos – Amerindios
15. Chile América – César Aguilera & Pancho Navarro
16. Venceremos  – Inti-Illimani and the voice of Salvador Allende

VA – Chile Pueblo (1972)
(192 kbps, cover art included, vinyl rip)

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For well over 30 years, Inti-Illimani (the name translates as “Sun God”) has held a beacon for Chilean music, both the traditional folk styles and the more contemporary nueva cancion. Back in 1967 a group of students at Santiago’s Technical University formed a band to perform folk music. Taking their name from the Aymaran Indian language of the Andes, they began playing traditional music – something few did back then – and quickly earned a reputation around the capital, becoming more and more adept on their instruments. By the ’70s they’d grown into a political beast, taking on the nueva cancion (literally “new song”) of many young groups, and being quite outspoken lyrically – enough to be forced into exile in 1973, where they’d stay for 15 years. However, they refused to be cowed by the Chilean dictatorship. Basing themselves in Rome, Italy, they continued to record, and toured more heavily then ever before, earning a powerful reputation around the globe, and becoming very unofficial ambassadors of Chilean music, as well as opponents to the ruling regime. In addition to performing with a number of famous, political figures like Pete Seeger and Mikis Theodorakis, they were included on the famous 1988 Amnesty International Tour, along with Sting, Peter Gabriel, and Bruce Springsteen.
 
This was not the first album to be released by the Chilean folk group Inti-Illimani. But it was the first of the group’s albums to emerge from a new life as exiles in Rome; so, literally, this spirited music of revolution and rebellion was recorded within a short stroll from the type of hearty lunchtime pasta that is more likely to inspire a siesta. The decisive summarization of thoughts that sometimes occurs as a preamble to dreamland is a nice way to describe the choice of both repertoire and final program sequence. “Viva Chile!” lays bare the musical roots of this ensemble, in large part a style of folk music from the Andes that has unfortunately become a trifle stereotyped due to overexposure. In the case of Inti-Illimani, the growth from this original starting point has been lush, extending into a challenging form of expression known as nuevo cancion, or new song. Rich emotions and musical surprises bloom almost constantly from these pieces. In combination with politics, as in “Venceremos” or “Cueca de la C.U.T.,” it becomes a garden that any lover of protest songs will want to sit in and meditate. Sniffing along while the military industrial complex is overthrown is hardly the only sweet bouquet provided, however. From the very start of the album, intricate and terrifically mixed percussion breaks provide some of the finest moments. “Cueca de la C.U.T.” is simply amazing, sounding like small drunken men have invaded the speaker box with wooden mallets. Instrumental pieces involving various combinations of stringed instruments such as guitar, tiple, and charango are also part of the program, a style that the group seems to have downplayed in later releases. “Ramis,” “Tatati,” and “Subida” are short and simple treats; “Longuita” utilizes a picking style that sounds like country & western, though it is uncertain what country. “Venceremos” is the big vocal hit, an anthem among anthems, and as is typical in the effective sequencing, it is sandwiched between two of the instrumentals.           
 
 
This album was released in different countries on different labels, in Germany on the Pläne label as part of the “Serie Sieg”.
 
  • 01. Fiesta de san Benito – 3:41
  • 02. Longuita – 2:00
  • 03. Cancion del poder popular – 3:04
  • 04. Alturas – 3:02
  • 05. La segunda independencia – 2:37
  • 06. Cueca de la C.U.T. – 1:46
  • 07. Tatati – 3:32
  • 08. Venceremos – 2:29
  • 09. Ramis – 2:22
  • 10. ‘Rin’ del angelito – 3:23
  • 11. Subida – 2:03
  • 12. Simon Bolivar – 2:46

Inti-Illimani – Viva Chiloe! (Pläne, 1973)
(256 kbps, cover art included, vinyl rip)

Lin Jaldati was sent to concentration camps when the Nazis occupied Holland. She didn’t speak Yiddish, but learned Yiddish songs from her fellow prisoners. Jaldati survived Auschwitz; being a communist, she came to East Germany to help establish a socialist German state. She married Eberhard Rebling, a German Gentile communist who later became a member of the Central Committee of the Communist Party, and started to perform Yiddish songs for a German audience with Rebling accompanying her on piano. Later they were joined by their daughters Katinka and Jalda. Lin Jaldati dedicated her art and her life to communist East Germany. This didn’t prevent her from being banned from performing in the late sixties; the hysteria had gone so far that even performing Yiddish songs was interpreted as a pro-Israel statement. For a long time Lin Jaldati, who was highly accepted by what later became the East German Yiddish and klezmer scene, was the only Yiddish performer in East Germany.

 

In the GDR there was no connection to the world centers of Yiddish culture. Israel was seen as an aggressor and song collections, for example from New York, were exchanged among friends but could not be found in any libraries. There were a few recordings by the Leipziger Synagogue choir, mainly religious songs, symphonically arranged. And the well known singer Lin Jaldati: she had survived Auschwitz. Occasionally, official politics made use of her good name. In 1966, she was allowed to release her interpretations of Yiddish resistance and folk songs on one side of a record, and in 1982 an entire record was released. This album, “Jiddische Lieder”, with orchestra conducted by Martin Hoffmann, catches her in the last decade of her career. She can be heard intoning, speaking, shouting, and occasionally approximating notes amid the mostly world-weary singing.

Tracklist:

  1. As der Rebe Elimelech
  2. Dem Milners Trern
  3. Nisim fun Rabejim
  4. Hungerik Dajn Ketsele
  5. Rabojsaj
  6. Schwartse Karschelech
  7. In Kamf
  8. Jome, Jome
  9. Schustersche Wajbelech
  10. Ojfn Bojdem
  11. Tsip Tsapekl
  12. A Semerl
  13. Dort bajm Breg fun Weldl
  14. S’ brent

(192 kbps)

Juan Capra was a Chilean painter, singer and poet. He was active mainly in the 60s and 70s and

recorded in 1967 the album “Los chilenos – Juan Capra” with Quilapayún. Their album “Por Vietnam” featured a song by Juan Capra that mourns the death of Che Guevara.

His home was a sort of informal academy of singing, arts and crafts, and became one of the founding places for the Nueva Cancion Chilena. Here the famous “Peña de los Parra” was established,  a platform for songwriters as Isabel, Angel and Violeta Parra, Patricio Manns, Rolando Alarcón, Victor Jara, Payo Grondona, Patricio Castillo, Paco Ibáñez or Atahualpa Yupanqui.
Juan Capra died in 1996, at the age of 58, in poverty.

This album contains recordings made ​​by John Capra in Italy and was published as the first volume devoted to the Chilean resistance.

Tracklist:
Side 1:
1. Dicen que no caben- Resfaloza
2. Blanca Flor y Filumena- Romance
3. Dicen que los monos – Polka
4. Versos por padecimiento – Canto a lo divino
5. El hundimiento del Transporte Angamos- Vals
6. San Pedro se puso guapo – Cueca
7. Desen las manos – Pericona

Side 2:
1. Bajando de Los Andes – Resfaloza
2. Viva Balmaceda – Cueca
3. Tengo una pena – Vals
4. Sirilla – Sirilla (Según el favor del viento- Por qué los pobres no tienen)
5. Contrapunto entre el águila américana y el cóndor chileno
6. Yo me vuelvo para Chile – Sirilla

Juan Capra – Cile canta e lotta 1 (1973)
(192 kbps, cover art included)

Juan Capra was a Chilean painter, singer and poet. He was active mainly in the 60s and 70s and

recorded in 1967 the album “Los chilenos – Juan Capra” with Quilapayún. Their album “Por Vietnam” featured a song by Juan Capra that mourns the death of Che Guevara.

His home was a sort of informal academy of singing, arts and crafts, and became one of the founding places for the Nueva Cancion Chilena. Here the famous “Peña de los Parra” was established,  a platform for songwriters as Isabel, Angel and Violeta Parra, Patricio Manns, Rolando Alarcón, Victor Jara, Payo Grondona, Patricio Castillo, Paco Ibáñez or Atahualpa Yupanqui.
Juan Capra died in 1996, at the age of 58, in poverty.

This album contains recordings made ​​by John Capra in Italy and was published as the first volume devoted to the Chilean resistance.

Tracklist:
Side 1:
1. Dicen que no caben- Resfaloza
2. Blanca Flor y Filumena- Romance
3. Dicen que los monos – Polka
4. Versos por padecimiento – Canto a lo divino
5. El hundimiento del Transporte Angamos- Vals
6. San Pedro se puso guapo – Cueca
7. Desen las manos – Pericona

Side 2:
1. Bajando de Los Andes – Resfaloza
2. Viva Balmaceda – Cueca
3. Tengo una pena – Vals
4. Sirilla – Sirilla (Según el favor del viento- Por qué los pobres no tienen)
5. Contrapunto entre el águila américana y el cóndor chileno
6. Yo me vuelvo para Chile – Sirilla

Juan Capra – Cile canta e lotta 1 (1973)
(192 kbps, cover art included)

Daughter of South-American legend Violeta Parra, Isabel Parra learned to sing and play at an early age. “Music was a language fluently spoken at home”, she says.  In 1965, with the help of brother Angel Parra, she founded the very renowned “Peña de los Parra” – artistic center and “Art Lab” where started musical movement “la Nueva Cancion Chilena” (New Chilean Song). Here, in the center of old Santiago, chilean icon Victor Jara (a young comedian and theatre director in those days !) took a guitar and started to sing traditional and original songs.

Isabel Parra worked and performed with Victor Jara, Luis Advis and Quilapayun. Her first albums featured ballads drawn from South American sources, but as she traveled and grew older, so the artist became increasingly identified with the protest movement. “I’ve always used traditional rhythms and melodies. But I’ve handled them roughly and rearranged them into a new musical form. It was my concept of creativity”.
An impressive appearance at the 1972 Festival de la Canción de Agua Dulce (Lima, Peru) followed the singer’s early performances and established Isabel Parra as a vibrant interpreter of traditional material. She won the first price with her song “La hormiga vecina”.
Isabel Parra is one of the most exponents of Latin american folk song. She was exiled from Chile after the 1973 military coup and made many world tours as a messenger of Chilean politics and songs. She has now returned to Chile and is regarded as both guardian and developer of the Chilean folk movement. She continues to speak and sing for peaceful solutions to violence in Latin America.
 
(320 kbps, cover art included)

After the second world war any German folk music tradition was discredited.Tradition means that something considered valuable is passed on from one generation to the next. From this point of view it is obvious that the thread of continuity was broken in 1945. This does not mean that peoples’ memories were wiped blank. But the reputation and musical standard of “Volksmusik” wasn’t very high, little to interest young musicians. Simple melodies and rhythms, little artistic merit. No identifiable style. Any aspiring instrumentalists would be drawn into classical, jazz or or later into rock music. What was known as “Volkslied” had been taken up and re-shaped by composers and choirs long before the war. So even if it hadn’t been for the nazis the geographical and historical situation had worked against a distinctive musical tradition.

Thus it’s not surprising that many members of the younger generation in the Sixties turned to music from English-speaking countries. They sought an alternative to bland pop lyrics and a new, honest way to share the music, an expression of their generation. There was an “imported” Folk revival but except from some singer-songwriters there weren’t any big names to promote the music.

a new lease of life for old songs and dances - sadly it didn't lastThere were of course efforts to reestablish some German-language singing. In West Germany the political Left used songs of the democratic movement of 1848. Protest songs of oppressed farmers and labourers were re-discovered. A lot of research was done in the Seventies. Some folk groups like Fiedel Michel and Liederjan were successful by adapting German songs and tunes in the international “folk” style. Both had started off with anglo-irish music. But their success with their own generation couldn’t be transferred to the next.

Here´s the fifth Fiedel Michel album, called “Der Teutsche Michel” from 1978. It features a solo version of the famous antifascist song ” “Mein Vater wird gesucht” by the Fiedel Michel-member Elke Herold.

Tracklist:

A1 Mein Michel…
A2 Hornpfiff
A3 Vör Lammdal up’n Steen
A4 Es soll sich der Mensch nicht…
A5 Aulacostephanus
A6 Matrosentanz / Mädel wasch dich
A7 Es ist ein Schnee gefallen
A8 Lied an einem Boten
B1 Sterntanz
B2 Der Winter ist vergangen
B3 De Haut, de hät en Thaler kost
B4 Bretonische Polka
B5 Störtebecker
B6 Flämische Tänze
B7 Mein Vater wird gesucht
B8 Dennis Murphy’s Polka

Fiedel Michel – Der Teutsche Michel (1978)
(320 kbps, front & back cover included, vinyl rip)

After the second world war any German folk music tradition was discredited.Tradition means that something considered valuable is passed on from one generation to the next. From this point of view it is obvious that the thread of continuity was broken in 1945. This does not mean that peoples’ memories were wiped blank. But the reputation and musical standard of “Volksmusik” wasn’t very high, little to interest young musicians. Simple melodies and rhythms, little artistic merit. No identifiable style. Any aspiring instrumentalists would be drawn into classical, jazz or or later into rock music. What was known as “Volkslied” had been taken up and re-shaped by composers and choirs long before the war. So even if it hadn’t been for the nazis the geographical and historical situation had worked against a distinctive musical tradition.

Thus it’s not surprising that many members of the younger generation in the Sixties turned to music from English-speaking countries. They sought an alternative to bland pop lyrics and a new, honest way to share the music, an expression of their generation. There was an “imported” Folk revival but except from some singer-songwriters there weren’t any big names to promote the music.

a new lease of life for old songs and dances - sadly it didn't lastThere were of course efforts to reestablish some German-language singing. In West Germany the political Left used songs of the democratic movement of 1848. Protest songs of oppressed farmers and labourers were re-discovered. A lot of research was done in the Seventies. Some folk groups like Fiedel Michel and Liederjan were successful by adapting German songs and tunes in the international “folk” style. Both had started off with anglo-irish music. But their success with their own generation couldn’t be transferred to the next.

Here´s the fifth Fiedel Michel album, called “Der Teutsche Michel” from 1978. It features a solo version of the famous antifascist song ” “Mein Vater wird gesucht” by the Fiedel Michel-member Elke Herold.

Tracklist:

A1 Mein Michel…
A2 Hornpfiff
A3 Vör Lammdal up’n Steen
A4 Es soll sich der Mensch nicht…
A5 Aulacostephanus
A6 Matrosentanz / Mädel wasch dich
A7 Es ist ein Schnee gefallen
A8 Lied an einem Boten
B1 Sterntanz
B2 Der Winter ist vergangen
B3 De Haut, de hät en Thaler kost
B4 Bretonische Polka
B5 Störtebecker
B6 Flämische Tänze
B7 Mein Vater wird gesucht
B8 Dennis Murphy’s Polka

Fiedel Michel – Der Teutsche Michel (1978)
(320 kbps, front & back cover included, vinyl rip)

ImageHere are our heroes from Hannover, Hans-A-Plast, with their EP “Sex Sex Sex”, released in 1981 on the No Fun label, containing the tracks “Sex Sex Sex” and “Lemminger Punks”.

Hans-A-Plast – Sex Sex Sex EP (1981)
(192 kbps, cover art included)

The West German folk revival that followed in the wake of the Anglo-American folk revival of the 1960s and 1970s took a strong edge of political and social criticism that left little room for folk romanticism. Partly associated with the “68 generation” (the German political students´movement that also based their protest on, among many other issues, the Nazi bakcground of their parent´s generaation), groups and performers such as Hannes Wader, Franz Josef Degenhard, Liederjan, Zupfgeigenhansel and Fiedel Michel built up a large repertoire of worker´s songs, political material, and songs from as far back as the Peasant´s Wars of 1525 and the 1848 revolution.

Musically, these performers also deviated srongly from previous folk traditins. Similar to revival performers in other European countries, many Germans started out by imitating American, Irish, and Scottish musicians and developed an interest in their own mus only later.

Fiedel Michel´s album “Kennst Du das Land…” was released in 1981 on the Nature label. It was recorded in Dublin. The titel track is their version of the famous Erich Kastner poem. “Friedlicher Mittag” is based on a poem by Rolf Dieter Brinkmann, an important forerunner of the German so-called Pop-Literatur.

Tracklist:

A1 Kennst Du das Land, wo die Kanonen Blühn ? 5:15
A2 Kleines Rondo 3:55
A3 Der Winter ist vergangen 3:20
A4 Friedlicher Mittag 2:50
A5 In Senden ist der Löwe los 4:10
B1 Raumschot 3:26
B2 Ich bin ein freier Mann 4:05
B3 Trilobit 4:45
B4 Mein Michel 3:40
B5 Meridian 3:55

Fiedel Michel – Kennst Du das Land… (1981)
(320 kbps, front cover included, vinyl rip)