Archive for April, 2014


“Alive and Kicking in L.A.” is Hazel O’Connor’s live album, released in 1990 and then re-released under other names such as “L.A. Confidential”. This live album includes hits like “Will You! and “D-Days” plus other rare tracks.

Tracklisting:

1 D-Days 4:29
2 Reach 4:55
3 Driftwood 5:20
4 Black Man 5:09
5 Summertime 4:19
6 Tell Me Why 3:53
7 Just Like A Woman 5:32
8 Time After Time 4:50
9 Will You 5:17
10 Sing Out Sister 4:33

Hazel O´Connor – Alive And Kicking In L.A. (1994)
(256 kbps, front cover included)

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“Alive and Kicking in L.A.” is Hazel O’Connor’s live album, released in 1990 and then re-released under other names such as “L.A. Confidential”. This live album includes hits like “Will You! and “D-Days” plus other rare tracks.

Tracklisting:

1 D-Days 4:29
2 Reach 4:55
3 Driftwood 5:20
4 Black Man 5:09
5 Summertime 4:19
6 Tell Me Why 3:53
7 Just Like A Woman 5:32
8 Time After Time 4:50
9 Will You 5:17
10 Sing Out Sister 4:33

Hazel O´Connor – Alive And Kicking In L.A. (1994)
(256 kbps, front cover included)

The Congos are a reggae vocal group from Jamaica which formed as the duo “Ashanti” Roy Johnson (tenor) (b. Roydel Johnson, 1947, Hanover, Jamaica) and Cedric Myton (falsetto) (b. 1947, Saint Catherine Parish, Jamaica), later becoming a trio with the addition of Watty Burnett (baritone) (b.early 1950s, Port Antonio, Jamaica) and have been active on and off from the mid-1970s until the present day. They are best known for their “Heart of the Congos” album, recorded with Lee “Scratch” Perry.

“Image Of Africa” by the Congos is seldom heard, but it has great songs, great singing and great playing. The sound is more polished-up and accessible than what you hear on the album “Heart of the Congos”, which gets such good press. Still, you’ll enjoy a solid roots sound with Cedric Myton’s high vocal leading the way. The songs are complex, the musicianship is awesome and it’s heavy with grooves

Tracklist:

Only Jah Know
Mister Biggs
Food For The Rainy Day
Sweetest Name
He Is The King
Music Maker
Musical Iration
Stay Alive
Stay Alive Dub

Cedric Myton & Congo – Image Of Africa (1979)
(320 kbps, cover art included)

The Congos are a reggae vocal group from Jamaica which formed as the duo “Ashanti” Roy Johnson (tenor) (b. Roydel Johnson, 1947, Hanover, Jamaica) and Cedric Myton (falsetto) (b. 1947, Saint Catherine Parish, Jamaica), later becoming a trio with the addition of Watty Burnett (baritone) (b.early 1950s, Port Antonio, Jamaica) and have been active on and off from the mid-1970s until the present day. They are best known for their “Heart of the Congos” album, recorded with Lee “Scratch” Perry.

“Image Of Africa” by the Congos is seldom heard, but it has great songs, great singing and great playing. The sound is more polished-up and accessible than what you hear on the album “Heart of the Congos”, which gets such good press. Still, you’ll enjoy a solid roots sound with Cedric Myton’s high vocal leading the way. The songs are complex, the musicianship is awesome and it’s heavy with grooves

Tracklist:

Only Jah Know
Mister Biggs
Food For The Rainy Day
Sweetest Name
He Is The King
Music Maker
Musical Iration
Stay Alive
Stay Alive Dub

Cedric Myton & Congo – Image Of Africa (1979)
(320 kbps, cover art included)

Belafonte’s follow-up album to “The Midnight Special” is another record stressing the diversity of world music. This time, a small combo accompanies Belafonte on the various tracks, as opposed to the big band approach of his last album.

Several crowd-pleasers were introduced on this album for the first time: the calypso “Zombie Jamboree,” awhich soon replaced “Matilda” as Belafonte’s epic audience participation song; and the showtune “Try to Remember,” from the off-Broadway show “The Fantasticks”.

The two highlights on the album are both songs dealing with American folk music. “Betty an’ Dupree” is a classic murder ballad in the tradition of “Frankie and Johnny,” performed with the intensity the subject matter commands. Country-western composer Merle Travis’ “Dark as a Dungeon,” a protest song dealing with the dreary, bitter life of the coal miner was inadvertantly recorded during a thunderstorm, giving the song a dose of ominous spontaneity.

Two of Belafonte’s proteges from South Africa are also featured: singer Miriam Makeba and jazz trumpeter Hugh Masekela. Some of the ballads are weak when compared to the more dramatic highlights, but still, this is a very satisfying album.
             
Tracklist:
01. Tongue Tie Baby (B.Eaton)
02. Who’s Gonna Be Your Man (Brookes-Minkoff)
03. ‘Long About Now (Hellerman-Minkoff)
04. Bamotsweri (with Miriam Makeba) (Makeba)
05. I’m On My Way To Saturday (Guryan)
06. Betty An’ Dupree (Calabata Leonard De Paur)
07. Summertime Love (Loesser)
08. Lyla, Lyla (Alterman-Zeira)
09. Zombie Jamboree (Mauge Jr)
10. Try To Remember (Schmidt-Jones)
11. Dark As A Dungeon (Travis)

Harry Belafonte – The Many Moods Of Belafonte (1962)
(192 kbps, front cover included)

A true heavyweight, Caetano Veloso is a pop musician/poet/filmmaker/political activist whose stature in the pantheon of international pop musicians is on a par with that of Bob Dylan, Bob Marley, and Lennon/McCartney. And even the most cursory listen to his recorded output over the last few decades proves that this is no exaggeration. Veloso is most known for his participation in the Brazilian musical movement Tropicalismo which encompassed theatre, poetry and music in the 1960s, at the beginning of the Brazilian military dictatorship.
            
 
Released in 1972, “Transa” was recorded by Caetano Veloso during his exile in London, England, shortly before his return to Brazil. The sound of ’70s electric rock predominates, fused with Brazilian rhythms and percussion, berimbau sounds, and his own violão playing. Several lyrics in English, and also in Portuguese, carefully avoid direct reference to politics, which may be found disguised in all songs, especially in the melancholic and depressed images of the poem by Gregório de Matos, “Triste Bahia,” for which Veloso wrote the music.

“It’s a Long Way” also makes ciphered references to the political situation and was broadly played in the ’70s. The broad use of pontos de capoeira (music used for accompaniment of capoeira, a martial art developed by Brazilian slaves as a resistance against the whites) can also be understood in that sense. The album also has “Mora na Filosofia,” a classic and beautiful samba by Monsueto that scandalized people with its rock rendition.

     
Diedrich Diederichsen (born August 15, 1957) is a German author, music journalist and cultural critic. He is one of Germany′s most renowned intellectual writers at the crossroads of the arts, politics, and pop culture. He describes Caetano Veloso´s wonderful “Nine Out Of Ten” as “the perfect pop-song”.

Tracklist:

A1 You Don’t Know Me 3:50
A2 Nine Out Of Ten 4:55
A3 Triste Hahia

Written-By – Gregório De Mattos

9:32
B1 It’s A Long Way 6:05
B2 Mora Na Filosofia

Written-By – Arnaldo Passos, Monsueto Menezes

6:16
B3 Neolithic Man 4:42
B4 Nostalgia (That’s What Rock’n Roll Is All About) 1:20

Caetano Veloso – Transa (1972)
(192 kbps, cover art included)

Born in 1936 in Hamburg as the son of a Jewish deckhand, Biermann was confronted with totalitarianism, prosecution and loss as a young child.
His father, who was active in the communist resistance, was murdered at Auschwitz in 1943. In the same year, he and his mother fled Hamburg as the Allies bombarded it.

Some 300,000 people left East Germany for the west in 1953, but 17-year-old Biermann went against the flow. He settled in the socialist German state out of political conviction and, two years later, began studying economics, philosophy and math at Humboldt University in Berlin.

With the support of composer Hans Eisler, Biermann began to write songs and poems and perform cabaret. He also worked as an assistant producer at the famed Berliner Ensemble for two years.
After publishing his some of his works in East German magazines and anthologies, he endeavored to found a small theater of his own.
Just before the first performance, the theater was shut down by the state and Biermann was expelled from the communist party and banned from practicing his profession for half a year. The play was about the building of the Berlin Wall.
Conflict with the GDR authorities only compounded. After his first concert tour in West Germany and the publication of his poetry book “Die Drahtharfe” (“The Wire Harp”) by a West Berlin publishing house, the singer-songwriter-poet was accused of being a traitor and banned from performing, publishing and traveling abroad.

For 12 years, Biermann sang for himself or for small, private audiences in his East Berlin apartment on Chausseestrasse. Some of his albums, however, were smuggled over to the west and his songs became more popular there than in the east.
In September 1976 Biermann was finally permitted to perform publicly again in the GDR and two months later he was given a visa to go on tour in West Germany.
Three days after his legendary concert in the Cologne sport arena, he was expatriated by the East German party leaders for his “hostile performance” and not permitted to return to the GDR.

Over 100 artists, writers and actors in the socialist German state staged public protests. When the authorities responded with intimidation, jail sentences and bans, masses of intellectuals picked up and left the GDR.
Biermann saw his expatriation as a catastrophe. “I thought it was all over with my life as a singer and poet,” he said later.
Indeed, the first years in exile weren’t easy. Nevertheless, the “Troubadour of inner German conflict,” as the “Süddeutsche Zeitung” called him in a 1987 article, carried on with his career. He published several volumes of lyric and prose and settled old scores with both East and West Germany on concert tours at home and abroad.
Biermann was enthusiastically received at his first performance in eastern Germany after the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989. He’d already broken with the socialism his former homeland was shedding.

In the 1990s he began exploring his Jewish roots more extensively and was active in politics and media. He campaigned against the Party of Democratic Socialism, the successor to the East German communist party and became head cultural correspondent for the daily newspaper Die Welt in 2003.
Today, Biermann is still an uncomfortable and controversial coeval. He’s not afraid to stick his finger in open wounds and stir up discussion. Even if not everyone likes his message, at least it comes across.
“I can’t complain that I’ve been fundamentally misunderstood. I’ve generally always been well understood,” he told Deutsche Welle reporters.

“Warte nicht auf beßre Zeiten” was the second album by Wolf Biermann, released in 1973. This cd reissue completes the 8 tracks of the original album by 3 re-recorded tracks, originally released in 1968 on the single “4 neue Lieder” (Wagenbachs Quartplatte).

Wolf Biermann – Warte nicht auf beßre Zeiten (1973) & 3 tracks
(256 kbps, cover art included)

So here´s volume 2 of this great collection of 50s/60s beat and jazz cuts, of songs and poetry.
This album was released on Pesky Serpent records with 16 rare and obscure tracks featuring beat poetry, be-bop and hip beat-jazz. Invokes the atmosphere of a smokey underground club from the late ’50s/early ’60s making this one of thee coooolest comps you’ll ever hear!
Artists include Buddy Collette, Kenyon Hopkins, Amus Moore, Wardell Gray, Young Tiger, Babs Gonzales, Muhamed Habeebalah, Ernie Andrews, Oscar Moore, Early Zell, Katie Lee, Johnny Lewis Trio + Millie, Bing Day, Maxwell H. Brock, Joya Sherril, and Mel Henke.
Beat Jazz – Pictures From The Gone World Volume 2
(256 kbps, front & back cover included)
The first in a series of five immensely popular Pete Seeger releases, “American Favorite Ballads, Vol. 1” was intended to gather together and set down songs that “everyone” knew (or seemed to know), in simple, unadorned musical settings, accompanied by his guitar or banjo, that adults and children could learn and sing together.

At the time, the albums were primarily aimed at schools and libraries, though one can bet that more than a few progressive-minded and left-leaning families bought them a well, even if these weren’t the union and topical songs Seeger was loved for in those circles, if only as a statement against the blacklist that had hurt the artist’s career; one also wonders, as a minor point, if the decision to include “Big Rock Candy Mountain” wasn’t a little zing at Burl Ives, for whom the song had been something of a signature tune, and who had ended up on the opposite side of Seeger in the ideological wars of the 1950s (a hatchet that wasn’t fully buried between them until the ’80s).

Seeger’s range on this album is stunning, from the gentle simplicity of “Skip to My Lou” to the rousing exuberance of “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep” – his voice is melodious and powerful across a range that may surprise listeners who only know the artist for the recordings done in his seventies and eighties – and while his guitar playing is fine, it’s his banjo work that is the real treat across these songs. For a man who (supposedly) so resented the electrification of folk music, Seeger isn’t shy about spinning some (admittedly acoustic) pyrotechnics out of his banjo when the song seems to call for it. Moe Asch’s recording technology was more than good enough for Seeger and his instrument, and the tapes have held up across five decades. And as to the songs, they encompass folk, country, and gospel standards, and their sheer power is perhaps the most amazing aspect of this record (and its four follow-ups): the world and its so-called culture, popular or otherwise, have moved on so far (even in the late ’60s, these seemed kind of hokey to kids who thought they knew better) that 50-plus years later, this record is still an education, as well as a rare treat.                

Tracklist:

A1 Down In The Valley
A2 Mary Don’t You Weep
A3 The Blue Tail Fly
A4 Yankee Doodle
A5 Cielito Lindo
A6 Buffalo Gals
A7 The Wabash Cannon Ball
A8 So Long, It’s Been Good To Know You

Written-By – Woody Guthrie

B1 The Wagoner’s Lad
B2 The Big Rock Candy Mountain
B3 The Wreck Of The Old ’97
B4 On Top Of Old Smokey
B5 I Ride An Old Paint
B6 Frankie And Johnny
B7 Old Dan Tucker
B8 Skip To My Lou
B9 Home On The Range

Pete Seeger – American Favorite Ballads, Vol. 1
(256 kbps, cover art included)

The first in a series of five immensely popular Pete Seeger releases, “American Favorite Ballads, Vol. 1” was intended to gather together and set down songs that “everyone” knew (or seemed to know), in simple, unadorned musical settings, accompanied by his guitar or banjo, that adults and children could learn and sing together.

At the time, the albums were primarily aimed at schools and libraries, though one can bet that more than a few progressive-minded and left-leaning families bought them a well, even if these weren’t the union and topical songs Seeger was loved for in those circles, if only as a statement against the blacklist that had hurt the artist’s career; one also wonders, as a minor point, if the decision to include “Big Rock Candy Mountain” wasn’t a little zing at Burl Ives, for whom the song had been something of a signature tune, and who had ended up on the opposite side of Seeger in the ideological wars of the 1950s (a hatchet that wasn’t fully buried between them until the ’80s).

Seeger’s range on this album is stunning, from the gentle simplicity of “Skip to My Lou” to the rousing exuberance of “Oh Mary, Don’t You Weep” – his voice is melodious and powerful across a range that may surprise listeners who only know the artist for the recordings done in his seventies and eighties – and while his guitar playing is fine, it’s his banjo work that is the real treat across these songs. For a man who (supposedly) so resented the electrification of folk music, Seeger isn’t shy about spinning some (admittedly acoustic) pyrotechnics out of his banjo when the song seems to call for it. Moe Asch’s recording technology was more than good enough for Seeger and his instrument, and the tapes have held up across five decades. And as to the songs, they encompass folk, country, and gospel standards, and their sheer power is perhaps the most amazing aspect of this record (and its four follow-ups): the world and its so-called culture, popular or otherwise, have moved on so far (even in the late ’60s, these seemed kind of hokey to kids who thought they knew better) that 50-plus years later, this record is still an education, as well as a rare treat.                

Tracklist:

A1 Down In The Valley
A2 Mary Don’t You Weep
A3 The Blue Tail Fly
A4 Yankee Doodle
A5 Cielito Lindo
A6 Buffalo Gals
A7 The Wabash Cannon Ball
A8 So Long, It’s Been Good To Know You

Written-By – Woody Guthrie

B1 The Wagoner’s Lad
B2 The Big Rock Candy Mountain
B3 The Wreck Of The Old ’97
B4 On Top Of Old Smokey
B5 I Ride An Old Paint
B6 Frankie And Johnny
B7 Old Dan Tucker
B8 Skip To My Lou
B9 Home On The Range

Pete Seeger – American Favorite Ballads, Vol. 1
(256 kbps, cover art included)