Archive for September, 2013


Zupfgeigenhansel was a German folk duo founded by Thomas Friz and Erich Schmeckenbecher. They were activ during the 1970s and 1980s. The group took its name from the famous Wandervogel Songbook “Der Zupfgeigenhansl” that appeared in 1909, although the group’s repertoire overlaps only partially with the contents of the songbook.

Zupfgeigenhansel initially followed the idea of rediscovering and repopularising German folk songs with libertarian character, partly to be provided with their own melodies. These folk songs were dealing with the lives of “ordinary” people of the past centuries – they were telling stories about love, poverty, and venture, the contempt for authority and priests as well as the resistance against militarism.

Zupfgeigenhansel became a foundation stone – next Ougenweide, Hannes Wader and Liederjan – for an alternative German folk music, beyond traditional folk music occupied by conservatives.

Zupfgeigenhansel performed since 1974 in various folk clubs, mainly in southern Germany. A few radio appearances on the show “Liederladen” at “Südwestfunk” followed. 1976 her first album “Volkslieder I” was published on the Pläne label, “Volkslieder II” followed in 1977. That album was recorded in January 1977 at Conny Plank´s studio in Neunkirchen.


Tracks:
01. Ich bin ein freyer Bauern-Knecht (Traditional) 2.41
02. Und in dem Schneegebirge (Traditional) 2.35
03. Papst und Sultan (Traditional/Noack) 2.20
04. Annagret (Traditional) 1.51
05. Mein Michel (Traditional (Friz/Schmeckenbecher) 2.40
06. Mein Vater wird gesucht (Drach/Kohlmey) 2.50
07. Bürgerlied (Traditional) 3.23
08. Soldatenschicksal (Traditional (Friz/Schmeckenbecher) 2.37
09. Die bange Nacht (Traditional(Lyra) 1.43
10. Bibel und Flinte (Traditional) 1.22
11. Es dunkelt schon in der Heide (Traditional) 4.23
12. Die Brombeeren (Traditional) 3.04
13. Der Karmeliter (Traditional) 2.46
14. Ehestandsfreuden (Traditional) 4.16

15. Der Revoluzzer (live, bonus track) 2.28
16. Andre, die das Land so sehr nicht liebten (live, bonus track) 3.11

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Zupfgeigenhansel was a German folk duo founded by Thomas Friz and Erich Schmeckenbecher. They were activ during the 1970s and 1980s. The group took its name from the famous Wandervogel Songbook “Der Zupfgeigenhansl” that appeared in 1909, although the group’s repertoire overlaps only partially with the contents of the songbook.

Zupfgeigenhansel initially followed the idea of rediscovering and repopularising German folk songs with libertarian character, partly to be provided with their own melodies. These folk songs were dealing with the lives of “ordinary” people of the past centuries – they were telling stories about love, poverty, and venture, the contempt for authority and priests as well as the resistance against militarism.

Zupfgeigenhansel became a foundation stone – next Ougenweide, Hannes Wader and Liederjan – for an alternative German folk music, beyond traditional folk music occupied by conservatives.

Zupfgeigenhansel performed since 1974 in various folk clubs, mainly in southern Germany. A few radio appearances on the show “Liederladen” at “Südwestfunk” followed. 1976 her first album “Volkslieder I” was published on the Pläne label, “Volkslieder II” followed in 1977. That album was recorded in January 1977 at Conny Plank´s studio in Neunkirchen.


Tracks:
01. Ich bin ein freyer Bauern-Knecht (Traditional) 2.41
02. Und in dem Schneegebirge (Traditional) 2.35
03. Papst und Sultan (Traditional/Noack) 2.20
04. Annagret (Traditional) 1.51
05. Mein Michel (Traditional (Friz/Schmeckenbecher) 2.40
06. Mein Vater wird gesucht (Drach/Kohlmey) 2.50
07. Bürgerlied (Traditional) 3.23
08. Soldatenschicksal (Traditional (Friz/Schmeckenbecher) 2.37
09. Die bange Nacht (Traditional(Lyra) 1.43
10. Bibel und Flinte (Traditional) 1.22
11. Es dunkelt schon in der Heide (Traditional) 4.23
12. Die Brombeeren (Traditional) 3.04
13. Der Karmeliter (Traditional) 2.46
14. Ehestandsfreuden (Traditional) 4.16

15. Der Revoluzzer (live, bonus track) 2.28
16. Andre, die das Land so sehr nicht liebten (live, bonus track) 3.11

The Last Poets – Same (1970)

If rap could be traced to one logical source point, this exceptional piece of vinyl would be it, without question. Though the strict adherence to syncopated rhythms and standard song structures are absent, all the elements that would later become the hallmarks of hip-hop by the early 1980s (and predictable fare by the 1990s) are here: vivid depictions of street level violence, vivid apocalyptic predictions of racial genocide. All that is missing are pointless party anthems. But running through all the songs on the Last Poets’ debut is an urgent sense of the need for radical action in the nation as well as the black community.
In addition to railing against the injustices perpetrated by white America, the Poets’ comment on the economic and social devastation of drugs (“Jones Comin’ Down,” “Two Little Boys”), complacency in urban families (“Wake Up Niggers,” “When the Revolution Comes”), the emotional release of sex (“Black Thighs”), and the weight of oppression that leads to hopelessness (“Surprises”). At the same time, they warn of the dangers of half-hearted commitment to revolutionary change: “don’t talk about revolution until you are ready to eat rats.” In the same manner that Marvin Gaye’s landmark album “What’s Goin’ On” depicted the problems that doomed black culture, the Last Poets are now seen by many as prophets. But also like Gaye, the realization that the problems depicted on “The Last Poets” are now much worse marks the record as an unheeded warning, far more than just a piece of Black Power kitsch.               

The Last Poets – Same (1970)
(320 kbps, front cover included)

If rap could be traced to one logical source point, this exceptional piece of vinyl would be it, without question. Though the strict adherence to syncopated rhythms and standard song structures are absent, all the elements that would later become the hallmarks of hip-hop by the early 1980s (and predictable fare by the 1990s) are here: vivid depictions of street level violence, vivid apocalyptic predictions of racial genocide. All that is missing are pointless party anthems. But running through all the songs on the Last Poets’ debut is an urgent sense of the need for radical action in the nation as well as the black community.
In addition to railing against the injustices perpetrated by white America, the Poets’ comment on the economic and social devastation of drugs (“Jones Comin’ Down,” “Two Little Boys”), complacency in urban families (“Wake Up Niggers,” “When the Revolution Comes”), the emotional release of sex (“Black Thighs”), and the weight of oppression that leads to hopelessness (“Surprises”). At the same time, they warn of the dangers of half-hearted commitment to revolutionary change: “don’t talk about revolution until you are ready to eat rats.” In the same manner that Marvin Gaye’s landmark album “What’s Goin’ On” depicted the problems that doomed black culture, the Last Poets are now seen by many as prophets. But also like Gaye, the realization that the problems depicted on “The Last Poets” are now much worse marks the record as an unheeded warning, far more than just a piece of Black Power kitsch.               

The Last Poets – Same (1970)
(320 kbps, front cover included)

This week saw the 40th anniversary of the death of Pablo Neruda – so let us pay tribute to the famous poet through a musical version of his famous “Canto General”, recorded by Grupo Tolderia.

Pablo Neruda (July 12, 1904 – September 23, 1973) was the pen name and, later, legal name of the Chilean writer and politician Neftalí Ricardo Reyes Basoalto. Neruda assumed his pen name as a teenager, partly because it was in vogue, partly to hide his poetry from his father, a rigid man who wanted his son to have a “practical” occupation. Neruda’s pen name was derived from Czech writer and poet Jan Neruda; Pablo is thought to be from Paul Verlaine. With his works translated into many languages, Pablo Neruda is considered one of the greatest and most influential poets of the 20th century.

Neruda was accomplished in a variety of styles ranging from erotically charged love poems like his collection Twenty Poems of Love and a Song of Despair, surrealist poems, historical epics, and overtly political manifestos. In 1971 Neruda won the Nobel Prize for Literature, a controversial award because of his political activism. Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez once called him “the greatest poet of the 20th century in any language.”

On July 15, 1945, at Pacaembu Stadium in São Paulo, Brazil, he read to 100,000 people in honor of Communist revolutionary leader Luís Carlos Prestes. When Neruda returned to Chile after his Nobel Prize acceptance speech, Salvador Allende invited him to read at the Estadio Nacional before 70,000 people.

During his lifetime, Neruda occupied many diplomatic posts and served a stint as a senator for the Chilean Communist Party. When Conservative Chilean President González Videla outlawed communism in Chile, a warrant was issued for Neruda’s arrest. Friends hid him for months in a house basement in the Chilean port of Valparaíso. Later, Neruda escaped into exile through a mountain pass near Maihue Lake into Argentina. Years later, Neruda was a close collaborator to socialist President Salvador Allende.

Neruda was hospitalized with cancer at the time of the Chilean coup d’état led by Augusto Pinochet. Three days after being hospitalized, Neruda died of heart failure – this is what the official documents are saying. Already a legend in life, Neruda’s death reverberated around the world. Pinochet had denied permission to transform Neruda’s funeral into a public event. However, thousands of grieving Chileans disobeyed the curfew and crowded the streets. Neruda’s funeral became the first public protest against the Chilean military dictatorship.

Although official documents say Neruda died from complications relating to his prostate cancer, the timing of his death just days after the coup that deposed and killed his friend President Salvador Allende has led many to question the authenticity of these documents.

In 2011, Manuel Araya, a friend and former driver for the late poet, came forward claiming that Neruda was murdered. He said he believes Neruda was poisoned while being treated at the Clinica Santa María and that he was not in grave health at the time. Former President Eduardo Frei Montalva also died under suspicious circumstances at that Santiago hospital in 1982. He is believed to have been poisoned by the dictatorship’s forces during a routine surgery.
Araya’s statements led to an investigation instigated by Eduardo Contreras, a lawyer for the PC, and the exhumation of the poet’s remains from his Isla Negra home in April. So far, the only results released by the investigative team indicate that the poet did indeed have prostate cancer, but they have not yet ruled out poisoning as a possible cause of death.
On the anniversary of his death the nobel prize winning poet is anything but forgotten as the investigation into his possible murder continues.

Grupo Tolderia – Canto General
(128 kbps, cover art included)

This week saw the 40th anniversary of the death of Pablo Neruda – so let us pay tribute to the famous poet through a musical version of his famous “Canto General”, recorded by Grupo Tolderia.

Pablo Neruda (July 12, 1904 – September 23, 1973) was the pen name and, later, legal name of the Chilean writer and politician Neftalí Ricardo Reyes Basoalto. Neruda assumed his pen name as a teenager, partly because it was in vogue, partly to hide his poetry from his father, a rigid man who wanted his son to have a “practical” occupation. Neruda’s pen name was derived from Czech writer and poet Jan Neruda; Pablo is thought to be from Paul Verlaine. With his works translated into many languages, Pablo Neruda is considered one of the greatest and most influential poets of the 20th century.

Neruda was accomplished in a variety of styles ranging from erotically charged love poems like his collection Twenty Poems of Love and a Song of Despair, surrealist poems, historical epics, and overtly political manifestos. In 1971 Neruda won the Nobel Prize for Literature, a controversial award because of his political activism. Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez once called him “the greatest poet of the 20th century in any language.”

On July 15, 1945, at Pacaembu Stadium in São Paulo, Brazil, he read to 100,000 people in honor of Communist revolutionary leader Luís Carlos Prestes. When Neruda returned to Chile after his Nobel Prize acceptance speech, Salvador Allende invited him to read at the Estadio Nacional before 70,000 people.

During his lifetime, Neruda occupied many diplomatic posts and served a stint as a senator for the Chilean Communist Party. When Conservative Chilean President González Videla outlawed communism in Chile, a warrant was issued for Neruda’s arrest. Friends hid him for months in a house basement in the Chilean port of Valparaíso. Later, Neruda escaped into exile through a mountain pass near Maihue Lake into Argentina. Years later, Neruda was a close collaborator to socialist President Salvador Allende.

Neruda was hospitalized with cancer at the time of the Chilean coup d’état led by Augusto Pinochet. Three days after being hospitalized, Neruda died of heart failure – this is what the official documents are saying. Already a legend in life, Neruda’s death reverberated around the world. Pinochet had denied permission to transform Neruda’s funeral into a public event. However, thousands of grieving Chileans disobeyed the curfew and crowded the streets. Neruda’s funeral became the first public protest against the Chilean military dictatorship.

Although official documents say Neruda died from complications relating to his prostate cancer, the timing of his death just days after the coup that deposed and killed his friend President Salvador Allende has led many to question the authenticity of these documents.

In 2011, Manuel Araya, a friend and former driver for the late poet, came forward claiming that Neruda was murdered. He said he believes Neruda was poisoned while being treated at the Clinica Santa María and that he was not in grave health at the time. Former President Eduardo Frei Montalva also died under suspicious circumstances at that Santiago hospital in 1982. He is believed to have been poisoned by the dictatorship’s forces during a routine surgery.
Araya’s statements led to an investigation instigated by Eduardo Contreras, a lawyer for the PC, and the exhumation of the poet’s remains from his Isla Negra home in April. So far, the only results released by the investigative team indicate that the poet did indeed have prostate cancer, but they have not yet ruled out poisoning as a possible cause of death.
On the anniversary of his death the nobel prize winning poet is anything but forgotten as the investigation into his possible murder continues.

Grupo Tolderia – Canto General
(128 kbps, cover art included)

Argentinean folk icon Atahualpa Yupanqui became one of the most valuable treasures for the local culture. As a child living in the small town of Roca, province of Buenos Aires, Héctor Roberto Chavero was seduced by traditional music, especially by the touching sound of the acoustic guitar.

After taking violin lessons, the young man began learning how to play guitar, having musician Bautista Almirón as his teacher. For many years, Atahualpa Yupanqui traveled around his native country, singing folk tunes and working as muleteer, delivering telegrams, and even working as a journalist for a Rosario newspaper.
 
In the late ’30s, the artist started recording songs, making his debut as a writer in 1941 with Piedra Sola, later writing a famous novel called Cerro Bajo. In 1949, the singer/songwriter went on tour around Europe for the first time, including performances with France’s Edith Piaf. During the following decades Atahualpa Yupanqui achieved an impressive amount of national and international recognition, becoming an essential artist, a distinguished Latin American troubadour, and influencing many prominent musicians and Argentinean folk groups. Atahualpa Yupanqui passed away in France in May, 1992.                

Atahualpa Yupanqui – Camino Del Indio (1942-1944)
(192 kbps, cover art included)

Tracklist:

1.: Camino Del Indio 2.: Malambo 3.: Viento Viento 4.: Una Cancion En La Montana 5.: Camino En Los Valles 6.: El Kachorro 7.: Piedra Y Camino 8.: Vidala Del Silencio 9.: Me Voy 10.: Huajra 11.: Carguita De Tola 12.: La Viajerita

Argentinean folk icon Atahualpa Yupanqui became one of the most valuable treasures for the local culture. As a child living in the small town of Roca, province of Buenos Aires, Héctor Roberto Chavero was seduced by traditional music, especially by the touching sound of the acoustic guitar.

After taking violin lessons, the young man began learning how to play guitar, having musician Bautista Almirón as his teacher. For many years, Atahualpa Yupanqui traveled around his native country, singing folk tunes and working as muleteer, delivering telegrams, and even working as a journalist for a Rosario newspaper.
 
In the late ’30s, the artist started recording songs, making his debut as a writer in 1941 with Piedra Sola, later writing a famous novel called Cerro Bajo. In 1949, the singer/songwriter went on tour around Europe for the first time, including performances with France’s Edith Piaf. During the following decades Atahualpa Yupanqui achieved an impressive amount of national and international recognition, becoming an essential artist, a distinguished Latin American troubadour, and influencing many prominent musicians and Argentinean folk groups. Atahualpa Yupanqui passed away in France in May, 1992.                

Atahualpa Yupanqui – Camino Del Indio (1942-1944)
(192 kbps, cover art included)

Tracklist:

1.: Camino Del Indio 2.: Malambo 3.: Viento Viento 4.: Una Cancion En La Montana 5.: Camino En Los Valles 6.: El Kachorro 7.: Piedra Y Camino 8.: Vidala Del Silencio 9.: Me Voy 10.: Huajra 11.: Carguita De Tola 12.: La Viajerita

Honored all over the world as “The Voice of Latin America” and revered in her native Argentina as “a symbol of life and freedom,” Mercedes Sosa was a dynamic, inspiring figure, and one of the most versatile artists on the world music scene. Sosa was also widely known for her message of peace, international integration, defense of human rights and artistic and personal integrity.

After humble beginnings growing up in San Miguel de Tucuman, Mercedes Sosa spearheaded a traditional music and dance movement with her husband called Nuevo Cancionero which declared the materialization of protest music across Argentina and Chile. She served as a political figure of sorts by speaking out for the poor Argentines against military dictatorship and oppressive conditions.

In 1966, Sosa recorded “Yo no canto por cantar”, beginning a 33 year career with PolyGram Records while continuing to record political music banned from radio broadcasts. Viewed as a serious threat to Argentina’s military regime, Sosa was searched and arrested on stage at a concert in La Plata in 1979. After receiving a series of death threats she was forced into exile seeking refuge in Paris and Madrid, , where she finally settled, but persisted touring the US, Europe and Brazil.

Mercedes Sosa – Gravado ao vivo no Brasil
(192 kbps, cover art included)

Honored all over the world as “The Voice of Latin America” and revered in her native Argentina as “a symbol of life and freedom,” Mercedes Sosa was a dynamic, inspiring figure, and one of the most versatile artists on the world music scene. Sosa was also widely known for her message of peace, international integration, defense of human rights and artistic and personal integrity.

After humble beginnings growing up in San Miguel de Tucuman, Mercedes Sosa spearheaded a traditional music and dance movement with her husband called Nuevo Cancionero which declared the materialization of protest music across Argentina and Chile. She served as a political figure of sorts by speaking out for the poor Argentines against military dictatorship and oppressive conditions.

In 1966, Sosa recorded “Yo no canto por cantar”, beginning a 33 year career with PolyGram Records while continuing to record political music banned from radio broadcasts. Viewed as a serious threat to Argentina’s military regime, Sosa was searched and arrested on stage at a concert in La Plata in 1979. After receiving a series of death threats she was forced into exile seeking refuge in Paris and Madrid, , where she finally settled, but persisted touring the US, Europe and Brazil.

Mercedes Sosa – Gravado ao vivo no Brasil
(192 kbps, cover art included)