Archive for May, 2011


The Gambian band Super Eagles were pioneers of popular music in the Senegambian region at the end of the 1960s/start of the 70s, delivering a progressive blend of afrocuban, pop, soul, bluebeat, Congolese rumba, highlife and ndagga music. Using Wolof lyrics & rhythms, ndagga is the basis of what was to become ‘mbalax’. During their five year existence, the Super Eagles became one of the best travelled bands in West Africa.

Apart from the LP ‘Viva Super Eagles’ they released 4 singles, recorded in the Ghana Film Studios, which at the time was one of the few West African studios with sophisticated recording facilities.

Tracklist:
(A) VIVA SUPER EAGLES (Touray,Cham)
      DOHI GUDI BAHUT (D.Ndiaye)
      GAMBIA SU NOUS RAEW (O.Ndiaye,Jobe)
      ADUNA POTI NDALA (Cham,Gassama)
      LOVE’S A REAL THING (Touray,Jobe)
      HEY JODE (Lennon,McCartney)
  (B) GAMBIA ZAMBIA-AFRICAN UNITY (O.Ndiaye)
      DON’T DO THAT TO ME (Touray,Jobe)
      TAGU NEIN LEIN (Cham,O.Ndiaye,D.Ndiaye)
      ALIEU GORI-MAMI (O.Ndiaye)
      FALSE LOVE (Touray,Valentine)
      GAIL GAIN CHI RABI (Trad.)

Super Eagles – Viva Super Eagles (Gambia, 1968)
(192 kbps, front cover included)

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The Gambian band Super Eagles were pioneers of popular music in the Senegambian region at the end of the 1960s/start of the 70s, delivering a progressive blend of afrocuban, pop, soul, bluebeat, Congolese rumba, highlife and ndagga music. Using Wolof lyrics & rhythms, ndagga is the basis of what was to become ‘mbalax’. During their five year existence, the Super Eagles became one of the best travelled bands in West Africa.

Apart from the LP ‘Viva Super Eagles’ they released 4 singles, recorded in the Ghana Film Studios, which at the time was one of the few West African studios with sophisticated recording facilities.

Tracklist:
(A) VIVA SUPER EAGLES (Touray,Cham)
      DOHI GUDI BAHUT (D.Ndiaye)
      GAMBIA SU NOUS RAEW (O.Ndiaye,Jobe)
      ADUNA POTI NDALA (Cham,Gassama)
      LOVE’S A REAL THING (Touray,Jobe)
      HEY JODE (Lennon,McCartney)
  (B) GAMBIA ZAMBIA-AFRICAN UNITY (O.Ndiaye)
      DON’T DO THAT TO ME (Touray,Jobe)
      TAGU NEIN LEIN (Cham,O.Ndiaye,D.Ndiaye)
      ALIEU GORI-MAMI (O.Ndiaye)
      FALSE LOVE (Touray,Valentine)
      GAIL GAIN CHI RABI (Trad.)

Super Eagles – Viva Super Eagles (Gambia, 1968)
(192 kbps, front cover included)

No blues singer ever presented a more gentle, genial image than Mississippi John Hurt. A guitarist with an extraordinarily lyrical and refined fingerpicking style, he also sang with a warmth unique in the field of blues, and the gospel influence in his music gave it a depth and reflective quality unusual in the field. Coupled with the sheer gratitude and amazement that he felt over having found a mass audience so late in life, and playing concerts in front of thousands of people – for fees that seemed astronomical to a man who had always made music a sideline to his life as a farm laborer – these qualities make Hurt’s recordings into a very special listening experience.
 
Tracklist:
 
01. Nobody’s Business But Mine 
02. The Angels Laid Him Away 
03. Baby What’s Wrong With You 
04. Casey Jones 
05. Candy Man 
06. Lonesome Blues 
07. My Creole Belle 
08. Make Me A Pallet On Your Floor 
09. Trouble I Had All My Days 
10. C H I C K E N Blues 
11. Coffee Blues 
12. Shake That Thing 
13. Monday Morning Blues 
14. Salty Dog 
15. Spike Drivers Blues 
16. Here Am I Lord Send Me 
17. Talking Casey 
18. Hot Time In The Old Town Tonight 
19. I’m Satisfied 
20. Richland Women Blues 

Mississippi John Hurt – Ain´t Nobody´s Business

No blues singer ever presented a more gentle, genial image than Mississippi John Hurt. A guitarist with an extraordinarily lyrical and refined fingerpicking style, he also sang with a warmth unique in the field of blues, and the gospel influence in his music gave it a depth and reflective quality unusual in the field. Coupled with the sheer gratitude and amazement that he felt over having found a mass audience so late in life, and playing concerts in front of thousands of people – for fees that seemed astronomical to a man who had always made music a sideline to his life as a farm laborer – these qualities make Hurt’s recordings into a very special listening experience.
 
Tracklist:
 
01. Nobody’s Business But Mine 
02. The Angels Laid Him Away 
03. Baby What’s Wrong With You 
04. Casey Jones 
05. Candy Man 
06. Lonesome Blues 
07. My Creole Belle 
08. Make Me A Pallet On Your Floor 
09. Trouble I Had All My Days 
10. C H I C K E N Blues 
11. Coffee Blues 
12. Shake That Thing 
13. Monday Morning Blues 
14. Salty Dog 
15. Spike Drivers Blues 
16. Here Am I Lord Send Me 
17. Talking Casey 
18. Hot Time In The Old Town Tonight 
19. I’m Satisfied 
20. Richland Women Blues 

Mississippi John Hurt – Ain´t Nobody´s Business

“Beat Jazz” is a out-of-print 20 track compilation of cool 50s style jazzy beat numbers. Kind of
Beat era recordings from spoken word, to sung poetry, to bebop, to doo-wop, to R&B, to hipster and jive….
It was released on Pesky Serpent Records in 1994.

From the web:
“this is one beautiful collection of beat music,
spoken word and crazed goofballed lyrics. Way out there selections
of many unknown beat artists at their most primitive level spewing
forth underground sounds and styles of a bygone era. No Zane or kitch
here but straight ahead songs that ooze the beat feel! This is a
fantastic selection of music. For me its the beat of this genre…”

Tracklist:

1. FROSTY AND THE DIAMONDS – Destination Mars
2. SLIM GAILLARD – Travelin Blues
3. KENNETH REXROTH – State & 32nd
4. COLEMAN HAWKINS – Picasso
5. GREGORY CORSO – Bomb
6. SCOTTY McKAY – Black Cat
7. JACK HAMMER – Like
8. GIL MELLE – The Gears
9. DOCTOR BOP – Satin & Velvet
10. ANITA ELLIS w/DAVID AMRAM – The Crazy Daisy
11. BOB DOROUGH (by Ferlinghetti) – Dog
12. HARVEY ANDERSON – Monday Night at 8pm
13. JACK KEROUAC – Cockroach
14. THE COSMIC RAYS with SUN RA – Dreaming
15. ROY GLENN – Big High Song For Somebody
16. ADA MOORE – Devil
17. MOONDOG – Up Broadway
18. WOODY LEAFER – Drums In My Typrewriter
19. THE NEW BANGS – Go Go Kitty
20. ELLIE GIRL & THE 7 BEAT SULKS – Let’s Make It

VA – Beat Jazz – Pictures From The Gone World

The poet passed away. But his music will stay.

Enjoy this great show with some fantastic live tracks from Gil Scott-Heron playing the Village Gate in New York in 1976.

Tracks:
01. Intro Jam
02. 17th Street
03. Must Be Something We Can Do
04. It’s Your World
05. Home Is Where The Hatred Is
06. Johannesburg

Gil Scott-Heron – Live At The Village Gate, New York (1976)
(320 kbps, front & back cover included)

The poet passed away. But his music will stay.

Enjoy this great show with some fantastic live tracks from Gil Scott-Heron playing the Village Gate in New York in 1976.

Tracks:
01. Intro Jam
02. 17th Street
03. Must Be Something We Can Do
04. It’s Your World
05. Home Is Where The Hatred Is
06. Johannesburg

Gil Scott-Heron – Live At The Village Gate, New York (1976)
(320 kbps, front & back cover included)

Sad, sad news…

Gil Scott-Heron died yesterday in a New York hospital aged 62, after becoming sick on returning from a European trip.
His style melded jazz, blues political expression and spoken-word poetry on songs such as “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”, which critiqued mass media in the 1970s.
His influence on generations of rappers and hip-hop artists has been demonstrated through sampling of his recordings by artists, including Kanye West.
Although Scott-Heron was often called the “Godfather of Rap”, it was a title he rejected.
“It might have been that there was music in certain poems of mine, with complete progression and repeating ‘hooks’ which made them more like songs than just recitations with percussion,” he wrote, in an introduction to a collection of poems, in 1990.

Instead, he referred to his work as “bluesology” or “black American music”.

Scott-Heron’s most recent album “I’m New Here”, released last year, was widely acclaimed and brought him to the attention of a new generation. As news of his death was announced, modern artists including Chuck D of Public Enemy paid tributes.
Throughout his musical career, the poet and musician took on political issues of his time, including apartheid in South Africa, and nuclear arms. Before turning to music, he was a novelist, who published a murder mystery, called The Vulture, at the age of just 19.

Sad, sad news…

Gil Scott-Heron died yesterday in a New York hospital aged 62, after becoming sick on returning from a European trip.
His style melded jazz, blues political expression and spoken-word poetry on songs such as “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised”, which critiqued mass media in the 1970s.
His influence on generations of rappers and hip-hop artists has been demonstrated through sampling of his recordings by artists, including Kanye West.
Although Scott-Heron was often called the “Godfather of Rap”, it was a title he rejected.
“It might have been that there was music in certain poems of mine, with complete progression and repeating ‘hooks’ which made them more like songs than just recitations with percussion,” he wrote, in an introduction to a collection of poems, in 1990.

Instead, he referred to his work as “bluesology” or “black American music”.

Scott-Heron’s most recent album “I’m New Here”, released last year, was widely acclaimed and brought him to the attention of a new generation. As news of his death was announced, modern artists including Chuck D of Public Enemy paid tributes.
Throughout his musical career, the poet and musician took on political issues of his time, including apartheid in South Africa, and nuclear arms. Before turning to music, he was a novelist, who published a murder mystery, called The Vulture, at the age of just 19.

Happy Birthday, Mr. Zimmerman!

On the morning of April 25 1963, directly after the conclusion of his final Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan album session, Bob journeyed to Chicago for a live club appearance and a radio interview. The gig, on the evening of the same day, was at a newly opened club called The Bear, in which manager Albert Grossman was a partner. But the primary reason for the 700-mile excursion west was for Dylan to appear on a radio show the following evening, hosted by the extraordinary Studs Terkel.
Capturing the entire broadcast, during which Dylan is questioned and discusses with Studs his thoughts and ideas behind both the songs he performs and others he had written by this juncture, this CD contains a legendary event during which a 21 year old Bob Dylan also performs full acoustic versions of 7 self penned numbers.
Across just over an hour of airtime, Studs and Bob chat like old friends as Dylan is prompted towards playing certain tracks from his then fairly slim body of work, but comes up trumps by pulling songs not just from his imminent second record, but including one from the album after that and showcasing 3 songs that wouldn’t see the light of day on record until the 1990s.
Serving both as a historic document of a little known event in the career of a true musical icon, but also as a wholly enjoyable listening experience that stands up to numerous repeat listens.

The 1963Terkel performance and interview is a must have for any serious collector. Bob has come into his own as a performer even at this early date. The songs are well done, and Bob’s wit shines through on the interview.

Bob Dylan – Studs Terkel´s Wax Museum (1963)
(192 kbps, no cover art incuded)